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Edison Owls

About Us

We are the Edison Owls: Leeasha, Ashley, Nydia, William, Neftali, Shakira, Margarita, Sylvanie, Isaak, Franchesca, Jonathan, Luis, Orlando and Ramon. This is our first year working with DT Philly and we are excited! We are in Mrs. Barrett's Life Skills class where we are working towards graduating from high school, employment, and independent living skills. We are looking forward to identifying some problems in our school and coming up with ways to fix them through one of the design processes. We think this is going to a fun project and can’t wait to get started!

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Oct 31
Thanks for sharing your photos and ideas with us! We love the idea of fixing a flat with gum. Now that you know how to play, you can return to this game anytime during DT Philly- it's a great way to rev up your creativity.
Sep 29
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! We really enjoyed coming out to your class this week! You had great energy and wonderful ideas, and we're excited to see what you do with them.
Oct 6
10
10Great examples if design. We like that you focused on designs in your school and classroom- you're already thinking like designers!
Oct 31
20
Oct 27
Wow! We love that you took this activity a step farther and connected it back to students in your school. Trying it in a classroom setting is a great way to empathize, as well.
Oct 13
10
10Great work! It looks like your team considered a wide range of problems. Making sure students have school uniforms is an issue, and it looks like you already have some ideas on how you might design solutions! Be sure to stay open to new ideas as well- you might learn some new things as you research the problem.
Oct 20
10
10Great job! You identified a wide variety of people who will have opinions about school uniforms and be important to include in your solution. Since your problem bridges two environments- school and community- you may want to eventually narrow your focus to one aspect of this problem as you learn more from your research. We also like that you used post-its to make your rich picture a more collaborative activity!
Oct 27
20
12Great job observing and identifying characteristics of the families in the photos- you have a great eye, and observed some things we didn't even notice! Think about how you could apply these skills to your project- what kind of users are affected by your problem? What types of students experience your problem? The families in this activity look and experience things in different ways- and so do the people you're designing for!
Nov 22
Wow! You did a fantastic job observing your environment and discovering indicators of problems! We hope you take these impressive observation skills and put them to use as your start research for your project.
Oct 27
10
8Great job! We're sorry you can't see the designer directory-- we aren't sure what the problem is, but for now, we have put a copy you can download in the Resources section (look under the "my account" menu). The owl can be found in the notices that appear at the top of your team page- you have to click the "more" button. Make sure you're looking carefully for all the information!
Nov 3
10
8Thank you so much for presenting on Friday! We hope you got some great feedback from designers. Continue to think about all those people that are affected by your problem, and see if you can talk to all of them during your research. Another piece of feedback the designers gave was determining which uniform pieces most students who get sent home are missing. This data might affect how you design your solution. Great work so far- make sure to keep asking "why" and dig deep during your research!
Nov 9
10
8 It seems like you learned a lot from your research. We like that you interviewed multiple teachers to get different perspectives, and observing the school entrance in the morning to see students' reactions to being turned away was a good strategy--you may have seen some things that people wouldn't have told you! As you catalog your takeaways, make sure you're continuing to consider all sides of the problem as well as the variety of reasons that students are out of uniform.
Nov 17
10
10You learned a lot from your research and found a new direction for your project. Your new "how might we" statement is much more specific, which will certainly help with brainstorming! It might help to talk to an administrator if you can, since design solutions that involve changes to the uniform policy would have to be approved by administrators. Also, consider if your alternatives would undermine the current uniform policy--it seems like your goal is still for kids to be in uniform. Balancing students not missing class with the requirement to be in uniform will be something you need to keep in mind. Great job so far--keep up the good work!
Nov 22
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Dec 8
Nov 22
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Dec 1
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Dec 8
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Jan 19
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Dec 15
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Dec 22
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Jan 19
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Jan 26
Jan 5
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Jan 12
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Jan 19
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Jan 26
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Feb 3
Jan 26
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Feb 5
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Feb 5
20

Badges

Start Up- Zeroll Badge

Congratulations!  You're starting to see things with a designer's eye.  Great design comes from moments of discovery such as noticing a problem or an opportunity.  Sherman Kelly did just that in 1933 when he noticed a young ice cream server who had blisters on her hands from dishing out hard ice cream.  Kelly designed a new scoop made of cast aluminum that had fluid in the handle to transfer heat from a person's hand. This feature lightly softened the ice cream, making it easier to scoop.  In addition, the scoop efficiently rolled the ice cream into balls and did not have breakable parts.  The Zeroll scoop is one of the best in the business.  You can even find one on display in New York’s Museum of Modern Art!

Empathy- Better Shelter Badge:

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes!  Designers empathize deeply to understand the people they are helping, just as Ikea and Better Shelter did when they set out to create safer and more dignified housing for refugees.  The resulting "flat pack" shelter can be assembled by 4 people in just 4 hours, is built to last three years, and features durable walls for privacy, windows for light, a locking door for security, and a solar panel that powers an overhead light and can charge a cell phone. Also, the ceiling is high enough to allow a person to stand up straight.  Over 16,000 units have been distributed, and the shelter won the Design Museum of London's Beazley Design of the Year award in 2016. 

Define - Woodland and Silver Badge:

Nice work!  Research requires patience and persistence.  Just ask Norman Woodland and Bernard Silver, who were working and studying at Drexel in 1948 when they overheard a supermarket owner ask the school president for help developing an automated system to read product information at checkout.  They settled on a design—the barcode—resembling linear Morse code and obtained a patent in 1952.  But it took much more work over many years before their vision could be fully realized, and it was in 1974 that the first product—chewing gum—was scanned at checkout.

Ideate - AP Thailand Badge:

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see everyday things or experiences with new eyes, but that's exactly what AP Thailand, a real estate company, did in a crowded neighborhood in Bangkok where there was no room to build soccer fields.  AP Thailand literally thought outside the box and designed non-traditional fields to fit into spaces that were considered unusable.  These unusual soccer fields are a hit with residents who now have a place to play their favorite sport.

Prototype - C.B.E. Badge:

Far out!  Drinking out of a cup is something we take for granted, but in space, nothing is simple.  Until recently, astronauts have had to drink from tubes inserted into special beverage pouches.  Then, some engineers came up with an idea for a specially-shaped cup that uses principles of physics to keep liquid from floating away in the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station.  In 2015, astronauts on the ISS began using 3D printed prototypes of the cup as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment (C.B.E.).  

Test - Waymo Badge:

Now you get the picture…testing is very important!  How else will you know that your idea solves your problem (and doesn’t cause unintended consequences)?  In 2009 Google began testing concepts for a self-driving car, beginning with a retrofitted Prius operating on rural roads.  As their design evolved, their testing became more sophisticated, moving onto highways and then to more complex urban environments.  The self-driving car project, which Google spun off as an independent company called Waymo, has advanced its design so far that they are now conducting a public test of self-driving cars with residents of Phoenix, AZ.

DT Philly - StoryCorps Badge:

Hooray—you are on your way to getting your story out!  You want your audience to empathize with the people you are designing for, and to understand the steps, goals, and outcomes of your design process and solution.  Take a page from StoryCorps, an organization that collects and shares stories to help people understand one another’s experiences and perspectives.  Story Corps uses audio recordings, pictures, and animations to bring stories to life.  How will you tell the story of your project?

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!

Socializer Badge