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Los Platanos

About Us

Los Platanos

We are the Los Platanos!! We are apart of the Professional services here at Lincoln High school.We are here to compete in the mock competitions and take home a victory to Lincoln Railspliters.We are the future of business around the world and make a big & good impact & effect to the world that would help and improve things around the world.We are smart,intelligent,strong working men and that are looking to be certified in Microsoft and graduate from high school and have a good successful lives in businesses.

Recent comments on our work:

Denise Magasich · Risk Taking Tigers (RTT), Team Stoup, Los Platanos , Fabulous Seven, Team Gucci
We will email. We do not know why our work is not uploading correctly.
1/22/18 · Assignment: Empathy Map & Reality Check
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC
To improve your How might we statement you could possibly create a station where people could buy deodorant for $.50 which could go towards other supplies.
1/28/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Mark Phanor · Cookies and Creme
Free stuff kids might need is a good idea. We'd give them a helper badge for helping kids that need stuff, like dodarant. We have some kids who need it here also.
1/18/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Khyree Upsey · Team Tigers
I think that these pre-made bags are a really great idea. Another good idea is to put the fly kits with the school counselor and homeroom teacher, this way if the nurse is busy or absent, kids can get the help they need. Also, we have a question-will you ask businesses to donate supples for the fly kits? We made up a special badge just for you called the FLY KIT Bag badge. Also, we really like your name. We are called Team Tigers.
1/3/18 · Assignment: Dig Deep
Jamar Harris · Dynamic Developers
Your team is every smart, keep up the good work.
1/3/18 · Assignment: Design Challenges & How Might We...
Jamar Harris · Dynamic Developers
Keep up the good work!!!
1/22/18 · Assignment: Design Challenges & How Might We...
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC
To improve your How might we statement you could possibly create at station where people could buy deodorant or perfume for $.50 which could go towards other supplies.
1/11/18 · Assignment: Design Challenges & How Might We...
Sydney Mercer · Disston Dreamers
You guys do have a good idea and we do understand where you are coming from with your problem. We have seen some of your other work and you guys are doing a good idea and job with your work.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Oct 31
Sep 29
10
8Welcome to DT Philly! Your team seems focused and ready to get to work! We're excited for all you will do this year.
Oct 6
10
8Good examples of the types of design. We also like that you redefined each term with the example - it shows us you understand the differences between the types and the importance of each one.
Oct 31
20
20Thanks for having us out to your school for the mini design sprint! Remember all the tools we learned today as you work through your DT Philly project!
Oct 27
Oct 13
10
8You identified lots of interesting design challenges! The topic you picked for your design challenge is a very personal and sensitive one. Have you thought about how will you create a safe and compassionate way to discuss a sensitive topic like this--a way that maintains everyone's sense of dignity and respect? You may also want to take another look at your design challenge statement. If your goal is to help students who don't have the resources at home to address some of their personal care needs, start by learning everything you can about those situations and the needs, behaviors, concerns, and feelings of your fellow students before deciding on the solution. Is it possible that students wouldn't feel comfortable bringing their laundry to school? Keeping an open mind in the early phases of your design work and thinking creatively about different solutions will help you succeed in your design project.
Oct 20
10
8Talking to people and observing situations are two great ways to do primary research! The nurse was a great person to interview, and the idea of using her office (which is presumably a place where students can have privacy) shows great empathy for your users. What kinds of observations did you do? We're also curious if you were able to learn anything from other schools that helps you with your project. Please submit your rich picture to earn 4 more points for this activity.
Oct 27
20
16Nice work identifying some users for your design problem! We hope that getting a fresh perspective helped you to understand your problem better. Make sure that your design solutions meet the needs of all the users you identified--not just one!
Nov 22
Oct 27
10
8Now you know how to better navigate the Compete360 site! The designer directory can be found under resources, and the owl is inside some of the announcements on your team page! Make sure you check those announcements-- they include important information and sometimes even rewards for completing certain parts of your project!
Nov 3
10
Nov 9
10
8A survey was a great idea for a research method. Since this topic is more personal, some of your users may have felt uncomfortable talking to you outright about their hygiene needs, but they may have filled out the survey. How many survey responses were you able to get? We're a little unclear about your other methods--what did you observe, exactly? People's reaction while taking the survey? Or their reactions at another time? Where did you find data about lack of hygiene supplies? We would love to hear more about your research methods!
Nov 17
10
8Thanks for resubmitting work! We love the new direction your project is taking because it was influenced by what you learned from your users!
Nov 22
20
8Doing proper research is certainly important, as you noted after watching the Cheerios video. What are some research methods that would be helpful to your project more specifically? What parts of your project need more research? Who haven't you talked to that you should? Share with us a few ways you can dig deeper to avoid a "cheerios mistake" to get 8 points back on this activity!
Dec 8
Nov 22
10
8Thank you for resubmitting photos and answering our questions! We would love some more close-up photos of your "better" and "best" solutions as well. You effectively scaled your good, better and best solutions. Changing attitudes and making students feel they belong can be tricky, so that fits well in your best solution. All of your solutions are practical, and realizable, which is great as well. We also love your tagline for the FlyKit "If you feel fly and look fly, you will act FLY!" Maybe this can be part of your marketing for the Flykit!
Dec 1
10
8Thanks for going back and resubmitting! It sounds like your team is very much on the same page about solution ideas and the goals you want to achieve. We like the focus on minimizing student embarrassment and improving how students feel. Think about, and check back with, these goals you've identified as you work on your prototypes. If your solutions meet all, or even some of these goals, you'll be on the right track!
Dec 8
20
8Taking the time to stop and look is very important. Nice work finding images in the clouds--we especially like your fried egg! Creating multiple prototypes is always a great idea--tell us what you found by stopping and looking at your project work so far, just like you did with the clouds, to get 8 points back on this activity!
Jan 19
Dec 8
10
8Thanks for clearing up which assignment is which! We think all three of these ideas might be good possibilities to prototype. We like the door-hanging design because you could easily add it to any space without worrying about finding storage. The referral form is interesting, but how will students react to receiving one of your notifications--how will it be delivered? Will other students be curious and nosy if someone gets a note during class? As you start to prototype think about how to bring your ideas to life. What might be some important considerations with how you package or present this? Could you actually set up the area in the nurse's office where you would like to distribute supplies? What are some important considerations for that space? Bringing your ideas to life in more physical ways helps you learn how the idea would work, or where you might run into problems.
Dec 15
10
8This is a great start to your prototyping process, but we would also love to see more prototyping! Could you mock-up the space in the nurse's office you want to display kits in? Or make a prototype door hanger? Talking to the pool teacher was a great step, but we wonder when students would have time to shower during the school day? Would they have to come early or stay late after school to use the showers? How would that work? We like that you're thinking about ways to take this project forward and acquire supplies while keeping costs down. Have you tried contacting any manufacturers for samples, yet? How was the request received? What about asking a local pharmacy or store? They may be willing to help out your school if they're in your community. The kit is a great start, but we would love to see prototypes of your ideas for distributing kits, or even for an entirely different approach! Thanks for submitting more photos of your prototype! It sounds like you've even started to do some user testing to find out which method of getting supplies students liked best! Think about what your next steps will be to test these (and any other) prototypes!
Dec 22
10
8We like the idea of stocking supplies in a convenient location so students can access them. Are these locations relatively private, as well? Could students access the supplies anonymously, or will it be obvious what they are doing? These may be things you want to observe during your testing, as they might affect how many people are willing to take the products. The second prototype is also interesting, but we agree with your drawback. Since this topic is so sensitive, students may feel embarrassed to be identified, and teachers may also feel uncomfortable identifying students. Do you have a plan for how you would fund the supply of the products? Also, how do you plan to survey students? It may be hard to find the students who use the products in your first prototype, and may also mess with results if you want students to be able to take the products without being identified. We would love to see some photos of your prototypes.
Jan 19
20
16Thanks for having the Compete 360 team out! We loved getting to hear more about the work you have been doing. You're right--it's very important to clearly explain what problem you are trying to solve and how you went about your process to the judges. Adding visuals helps you explain more clearly and makes your presentation more interesting! Keep practicing your presentation--we can't wait to see it at the DT Philly Challenge.
Jan 26
Jan 5
10
10Thanks for checking out the work that our Middle School teams are doing! I'm sure they appreciate your encouragement!
Jan 12
10
8It looks like you got a lot of good takeaways from user testing. It's interesting that your users prefer a pre-assembled bag to choosing their own supplies, and your users' questions indicate that some instructions or guidelines might help users know what they can do. Having a request list or taking a survey of what users might want to see in a Fly Kit seems like a good way to get more information about what your users need. Have you thought about how many bags you might need to start, and how often you will need to re-supply? How important do you think it is to be predictable and dependable in terms of making the kits available? If maintaining an ongoing supply seems like it might be difficult, you could consider options such as making them available on a certain day of the week or month and explaining that they are available while supplies last.
Jan 19
10
10The Fly Kit is a great concept, and your “next steps” will help you further develop your ideas. We love that plans for getting feedback preserves the privacy of your users. When we came out to see you, you mentioned creating gendered bags--is this something you're planning to incorporate into your next test? We would also love to see some pictures that show where and how you are distributing the kits (something else we discussed when we visited). As you think through the final steps of your plan, you should also consider how you will handle supply and demand, especially as you are just getting started--you will want your users to know what they can expect, and when they can expect it.
Jan 26
20
8Thanks for reaching out to one of our middle school design teams! To earn 8 points back on this activity, offer some constructive criticism for Team Tigers, and explain why you gave them the Arts and Stripes badge!
Feb 3
Jan 26
10
8Thank you for submitting your project summary, budget and implementation plan! Let us know if you need anything in the next week, and we will see you at the ballpark on February 8th!
Feb 5
10
10Thank you for submitting your slides. We appreciate your hard work this year, and we can't wait to see you at the ballpark on Monday!
Feb 5
20

Badges

Start Up- Zeroll Badge

Congratulations!  You're starting to see things with a designer's eye.  Great design comes from moments of discovery such as noticing a problem or an opportunity.  Sherman Kelly did just that in 1933 when he noticed a young ice cream server who had blisters on her hands from dishing out hard ice cream.  Kelly designed a new scoop made of cast aluminum that had fluid in the handle to transfer heat from a person's hand. This feature lightly softened the ice cream, making it easier to scoop.  In addition, the scoop efficiently rolled the ice cream into balls and did not have breakable parts.  The Zeroll scoop is one of the best in the business.  You can even find one on display in New York’s Museum of Modern Art!

Empathy- Better Shelter Badge:

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes!  Designers empathize deeply to understand the people they are helping, just as Ikea and Better Shelter did when they set out to create safer and more dignified housing for refugees.  The resulting "flat pack" shelter can be assembled by 4 people in just 4 hours, is built to last three years, and features durable walls for privacy, windows for light, a locking door for security, and a solar panel that powers an overhead light and can charge a cell phone. Also, the ceiling is high enough to allow a person to stand up straight.  Over 16,000 units have been distributed, and the shelter won the Design Museum of London's Beazley Design of the Year award in 2016. 

Define - Woodland and Silver Badge:

Nice work!  Research requires patience and persistence.  Just ask Norman Woodland and Bernard Silver, who were working and studying at Drexel in 1948 when they overheard a supermarket owner ask the school president for help developing an automated system to read product information at checkout.  They settled on a design—the barcode—resembling linear Morse code and obtained a patent in 1952.  But it took much more work over many years before their vision could be fully realized, and it was in 1974 that the first product—chewing gum—was scanned at checkout.

Ideate - AP Thailand Badge:

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see everyday things or experiences with new eyes, but that's exactly what AP Thailand, a real estate company, did in a crowded neighborhood in Bangkok where there was no room to build soccer fields.  AP Thailand literally thought outside the box and designed non-traditional fields to fit into spaces that were considered unusable.  These unusual soccer fields are a hit with residents who now have a place to play their favorite sport.

Prototype - C.B.E. Badge:

Far out!  Drinking out of a cup is something we take for granted, but in space, nothing is simple.  Until recently, astronauts have had to drink from tubes inserted into special beverage pouches.  Then, some engineers came up with an idea for a specially-shaped cup that uses principles of physics to keep liquid from floating away in the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station.  In 2015, astronauts on the ISS began using 3D printed prototypes of the cup as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment (C.B.E.).  

Test - Waymo Badge:

Now you get the picture…testing is very important!  How else will you know that your idea solves your problem (and doesn’t cause unintended consequences)?  In 2009 Google began testing concepts for a self-driving car, beginning with a retrofitted Prius operating on rural roads.  As their design evolved, their testing became more sophisticated, moving onto highways and then to more complex urban environments.  The self-driving car project, which Google spun off as an independent company called Waymo, has advanced its design so far that they are now conducting a public test of self-driving cars with residents of Phoenix, AZ.

DT Philly - StoryCorps Badge:

Hooray—you are on your way to getting your story out!  You want your audience to empathize with the people you are designing for, and to understand the steps, goals, and outcomes of your design process and solution.  Take a page from StoryCorps, an organization that collects and shares stories to help people understand one another’s experiences and perspectives.  Story Corps uses audio recordings, pictures, and animations to bring stories to life.  How will you tell the story of your project?

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

Collaborator Badge