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The Blossoms

About Us

We are a group of twelfth graders, we are students in the Health Related Technology Program at Abraham Lincoln High School in Philadelphia for three years. We've known each other very well and share a lot of the same values. As a group, we have chosen to do a project that will have a lasting impact. My name is Amy I am a hard worker I also enjoy doing hands-on things. My name is Brianna I am a determined person, a great listener, and an independent person. My name is Isses i'm very opinionated, outgoing person, also very passionate and will stand up for things I feel strongly about. My name is Genessy i'm a great listener, I'm a very trustworthy and a non-judgmental person. My name is Madison I am a outgoing person, very determined to be successful in life, I'm also very organized.

Recent comments on our work:

1/24/19 · Assignment: Discovery Chart
Tyquion Brittingham · The Dreamchasers
y'all got good ideas
1/24/19 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
Anayeli Vargas · MetriX, NASA
These are all great ideas! Are there any more?

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
4Welcome to DT Philly and thank you for submitting a team picture. We're excited that you're participating this year, and we look forward to learning more about your project. Don't foget to let us know your team name and write a little intro for your team (you can see examples from other teams by looking at the DT Philly leaderboard) to earn 4 more points for this assignment.
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
8These are fun ideas for phone cases! Just as you paid attention to your own needs and preferences in designing your case, you'll want to pay attention to the needs and preferences of other people--the ones you're trying to help--when you create your DT Philly design. You can probably tell from the designs submitted by your classmates that there are similarities but also differences in what each team wanted or needed...so the case you designed for yourself might not be the best design for someone else. Remember this as you work on your DT Philly project--the best solution you can design will come from a deep understanding of the people you're designing for.
Oct 19
20
Oct 5
Oct 5
We hope you had fun with this activity. Putting yourself in other people's shoes to understand their perspectives and experiences is important when you're designing solutions for others. Can you think of any ways you could empathize with the young people you want to help at the YES Center?
Oct 5
10
8Nicely done--this is a very thoughtful question about a complicated and important issue. We can't wait to see what you learn during your research! It can sometimes be hard for people to identify what they need when it comes to intangible things like feeling supported and cared about, so we encourage you to approach your research with great empathy and to speak with different people who have experience in this field in addition to drawing on personal experience.
Oct 12
10
4Nice work--you have a lot of things you could survey or interview teens about at YES. Do you think it might be a good idea to also survey the staff at YES? Sometimes it's hard to articulate what you need when it comes to something intangible like kindness, or friendship, or understanding, or emotional support. The staff has a lot of experience with the types of youth who come to YES, and they might have some good insights about how to provide support through personal connections, or what the teens there need and miss.
Nov 2
20
8Thank you for thinking about the audience for your project, and for level of detail you put into your profile of Sierra. We thought your project had to do with developing relationships with young people staying at the YES Center to help them feel less alone, so we're not quite sure how Sierra represents a "user" for your project. Can you tell us more? Let us know if you need some help with this activity! User profiles help you remember and stay focused on the needs, preferences, habits, and circumstances of the various audiences for you project as you conduct your research and develop solutions. So, some things to think about might be: For the purposes of your project, do all of the youth who stay there fit the same user profile, or do some groups have slightly different needs? When partnering with an organization like the YES Center, are the people who work there part of the audience for your project?
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
8Thank for submitting your initial research! It sounds like you're learning that this project will require a lot of sensitivity and empathy. We think a survey is a great idea to assess the feelings and needs of the population. What are some questions you'll be putting on the survey, and how will you distribute and collect it? Are you planning on interviewing any of the staff at the shelter? They could definitely have insights on what teens in their shelter need most. As you conduct more research, be sure to differentiate between what your team "thinks" and what you actually know to be true from investigating.
Nov 2
10
8It sounds like you uncovered some new needs that homeless teens have through your research. After talking with your school counselor, has your team added tp or changed anything to the survey you will conduct at the YES Center? It's great to get insights from your school teachers and counselors, but you'll want to make sure you also talk to the people who are actually experiencing your problem before your start designing a solution. Be open minded, sensitive, and curious as you conduct your research--you never know what you might uncover that will help you design a meaningful solution. If your research shifts your focus away from what you originally wrote about helping teens feel less alone, then you might want to do the "reality check" portion of this activity to help you update your design challenge question.
Nov 9
10
Dec 7
20
Thank you for taking the time to learn about some common logical fallacies. We're glad you don't think you see any of these in your own research, but are there any places where you could dig a big deeper? Any places where you don't have complete information or are relying on guesswork or assumptions? Doing thorough evidence-based research lays the groundwork for successful solutions. If there are important questions you haven't answered or user groups you haven't spoken with, these are places where you want to go back and do more work. Take a hard look at your research and share where you need to learn more to earn 8 additional points for this assignment.
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
8Thank you for submitting clear images of your work, it makes it much easier for us to read! It looks like your team is trying to tackle some very big questions here. The Discovery Chart is a place to summarize your research findings and identify takeaways (broad needs and goals) that you can brainstorm around. Check out the example we put in the handbook or on the website to see the layout of the chart. The information you get from your survey will be very useful for this activity, because it will help you answer some key questions about how to develop a peer support program meets the needs of the teens staying at YES: 1) How are the teens impacted by staying at YES? 2) What, if anything, are the staff and teens doing now to help teens feel less alone? 3) Why does the problem exist? (This one is partly self explanatory--because of their family situation--but you might find some important and creative opportunities to help if you dig a bit deeper: so much communication now is digital, so how does experiencing the type of trauma that lands teens at YES impact their willingness or ability to have supportive relationships?) 4) What else did you discover during your research? After answering these questions from the perspectives of those involved (teens, shelter staff, teachers etc.) you'll want to look for some themes that help you identify needs and goals your solution could address (you'll use these as categories for brainstorming solutions during your next activity, Genius at Work). Based on what you've shared so far, it sounds like some possible themes for brainstorming might be: 1) what possible ways can our program help teens at YES feel more "normal," 2) what possible ways can our program help the YES Center make teens feel cared for and supported, and maybe even 3) how can our program reduce or help teens deal with any stigma they feel about their situation?
Nov 30
10
4It looks like this is an extension of the Discovery Chart you submitted. It's always good to go back and add to your research and knowledge as you move through through the design process, but for this assignment we really want you to take the time to brainstorm many creative solutions for your problem. You want to take some of the broad goals and insights you gained from your Discovery Chart and brainstorm new ideas around those in this activity. It looks like you're headed in the right direction with some of additions you've made. For instance, you could brainstorm around ways to maintain the program to ensure it continues after you have graduated (and some specific brainstorming ideas for that could include making videos and a social media campaign, or training underclassmen to take over for you). Another area you could brainstorm around is how to make kids at the YES shelter feel less lonely or ways to support them. Try doing some more brainstorming and share with us to receive another 4 points on this assignment.
Dec 21
20
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
4It looks like you've done an outline of actions you have already taken to get closer to your solution, not an outline of the solution itself. Could you help us understand what exactly your team wants to design for a solution? Let us know some more details, and outline the design of your system to receive 4 more points on this assignment. For example, what would a program with monthly visits to the YES Center do? What would you need to do to coordinate it? Thinking through all of the details is important when you're designing a new program or system!
Dec 21
10
Jan 11
20
8If you want to do this extra-credit activity (and have time to do it), try coming back to do it AFTER you create your rapid prototypes. We haven't seen your prototypes, or test plans, which are some things you'll need before you can reflect on how to make your designs more thoughtful and meaningful (and earn more extra-credit points for this activity). Please let Ms. McAdams or us know if you need help with your prototypes.
Jan 4
Jan 4
Thanks for taking the time to try out this product (though we recommend focusing on your core deliverables until you get caught up and are in good shape for the DT Philly Showcase). Sometimes, an idea can seem really great in your head, but it doesn't work that well in the real world. Unlike this design, you want YOUR solutions to be easy to understand and use, and you want them to solve your main problem without introducing new problems. What will you look for when you test your solution ideas that will let you know how well they work? Can you think of any problems that might arise when you test your ideas? How will you try to ensure the success of your design?
Jan 4
10
8These sound like different components of the one program you want to create. Did you get any feedback from the YES Center staff or residents that informed your decisions about what your program will do? Does your program or club have a name? Can you get underclassmen involved...would that make it easier to sustain, and could you create recruiting materials and bring new students on board now? Or are you creating a senior class project for the HRT class (and if so, have you developed it beyond what last year's seniors did)? Whether it's a senior class project or a service club, what kind of plan or handbook will you create to carry this on? Does your initiative involve a schedule of regular visits and outings? How often does it make sense to visit if your goal is to make the teens at the YES Center feel less alone? We know you plan to test out getting more students to carry on the program in the spring, but how may you start making your program stronger now? Could you recruit more people to join now by advertising? We think it would really strengthen your project and your design process to get some input from the YES Center and to start creating materials to formalize this as a program or a club. Do you need an orientation or training for new students who want to be part of your effort? What would those orientation materials or training session look like? Do you need a budget and fundraising plan to ensure that your club can take the YES students on trips each year? Would a program handbook include a list and contact information for places you might go, services you might need (like a bus company), any forms you might need (permission slips?), etc.?
Jan 11
10
8It's great that you had the opportunity to go visit the YES center and interact with teens there! Did you get the chance to talk to them about what their needs and wants are? This could give you some insight into some of the activities or outings you plan for the program. It's interesting that the boys were harder to talk to than the girls. Do you think this may be due to the fact that your team is all girls? This might be something to consider when thinking about recruitment for future members of your program. How will your experience at the center inform what you do next in terms of developing a program--is there anything you might change or add to your program? Would some kind of training help students who join your program connect with all of the teens at YES? Did you get any input from the staff at YES?
Jan 18
10
Jan 25
20
We couldn't find where your team left feedback for the Dream Chasers. Remember to give them a shout out for some part of their work you really like and to ask a question or give a helpful suggestion. Knowing how to give and receive feedback are important skills to develop. You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. To receive credit for this assignment, please post more detailed feedback for one of your fellow DT Philly teams.
Jan 25
For your presentation, it will be important to tell your design story in a clear and compelling way. Including details about the process and roadblocks you faced throughout is a great way to do this! Be sure to include some of these outtakes in your presentation (as time permits) to give the judges a deeper insight into your team's experience!
Jan 28
10
5
Feb 4
10
5
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at, the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done!  Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years designing the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha VMAX motorcycle and Japan’s bullet trains, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll tell the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience your story?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, thinks about the spirit of the performance and the experience the audience will share.  How will you bring your story to life and connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 0 of 4

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

Puzzle Progress 4 of 6