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The Care Givers

About Us

We are "The Care Givers" from Abraham Lincoln. We are a group of seniors in the health academy, that are interested in helping people, and love making changes in our neighborhood and society. We are intelligent, athletic, joyous, and most importantly Caring.

:)

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Congratulations on solving the mystery! The teamwork and creative thinking you used here will come in handy throughout your DT Philly project.
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
8Thanks for sharing a bit about your team. We really like your logo and your mission, and we can't wait to see the great work your team will do!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
8These are fun ideas for phone cases! Just as you paid attention to your own needs and preferences in designing your case, you'll want to pay attention to the needs and preferences of other people--the ones you're trying to help--when you create your DT Philly design. You can probably tell from the designs submitted by your teammates that there are similarities but also differences in what each person wanted...so the case you designed for yourself might not be the best design for someone else. Remember this as you work on your DT Philly project--the best solution you can design will come not from what you think is best for someone else, but rather from a deep understanding of the people you're designing for.
Oct 19
20
We enjoyed visiting you and your classmates for the prototyping activity--you did great work--but that was a Prototyping Skills Workshop, not the mini design sprint from your activity list. We're glad you learned from this experience and we hope you had fun! However, there were no points associated with that special event.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Thanks for taking a walk in Jamal's shoes and understanding how life is more complicated for people with dyslexia. Understanding how a problem impacts people--the frustrations they have and the things they have to do to deal with the problem--is an important part of design research. How will you empathize with the people you're designing for in DT Philly?
Oct 5
10
8I know it took a while to agree on this, but you came up with a good focus for your design challenge question! As you do research and learn more about your problem, you may want to revise this to be a bit more specific about what kinds of things you'd like to help teens get (for example, "How mght we help teens at AIC get items to meet their basic needs in order to make life easier for them?"), but this is a great place to start while you do some research and learn more about their needs.
Oct 12
10
4These look like some good questions to explore during your research. Will you be asking these questions of the teens themselves, or also of the staff from the AIC program? To earn 4 more points for this activity, don't forget to submit a rich picture. You can find an example and instructions in your playbook.
Nov 2
20
16Thank you for creating these interesting profiles. You haven't told us what your DT Philly design challenge is, so we're not sure how these folks represent different user groups for your project. While they are all dealing with different situations, they all seem to be isolated. Does your project have somethng to do with that? It would be great it if you could take a few moments and go back to the "Our Design Challenge" assignment and create a "how might we" question that describes your design challenge
Oct 19
Oct 19
It's easy to get distracted and not notice everything that's going on...we had the same problem when we watched for the first time. Now we both know to be more alert to things that are happening right before our eyes! Being a good observer is an important skill for a designer to have. This means paying attention to details, noticing things that other people don't, and seeing things with "new" eyes (letting go of assumptions and preconceived notions). Try to practice this as you work on your DT Philly project!
Oct 19
10
8Thank you for sharing what you learned from talking to your teachers and counselors. Getting firsthand information from the students and staff at the shelter you intend to partner with is an excellent idea and will help you design a program that will be sensitive to their needs. What kinds of things will you ask that will help you determine what your program should look like? How much contact do they want or need to have? How do you help without making them feel self conscious? A survey is a good tool for getting information about your user group and those involved in the problem, and we can't wait to see what yours will look like.
Nov 2
10
8Have you spoken to anyone outside of your teachers and counselors? Maybe some of the youth you want to help and the staff at AIC would be good people to talk to about this need you mention for a platform and ability for self expression. And does this observation change the focus of your project at all? It's fine if it does...what you learn during research sometimes leads you to a different understanding of the problem. (If so, it might be helpful to update your design challenge question.) This is also why it's really important to do research with people who actually have the problem you want to address--the better you understand them and their experiences, the better your solution will be!
Nov 9
10
8Congratulations on finding all of the answers to this year's Scavenger Hunt! We will share your question with Mr. Tursi and see what advice he might have for you.
Dec 7
20
16Thank you for taking the time to reflect on your work to date to see where you might be making assumptions or need more information. Doing good research with and about your users will help you avoid mistakes that could arise from making decisions based on incomplete information, assumptions, or poor reasoning. Did your team assume that you wouldn't be able to relate to the teens due to your different circumstances? How can you overcome this? It sounds like the other "leap" you're describing is assuming that these kids want to talk to you about their problems. That's a good assumption to challenge since everyone is different in that regard. What does it take for you to want to talk to someone about your personal difficulties? Remember that good solutions are grounded in thorough and thoughtful research, so keep asking questions and challenging your assumptions!
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
8Thank you for submitting a clear image of your work! We love how detailed and thoughtful the ideas you generated for this activity are, it's obvious that you have a deep sense of empathy and compassion for this issue. The problem you're addressing is very big and deals with many systemic issues that may go beyond the scope of what you can address. Focusing on things you can do to ease the hardship of people who are affected by these larger issues is a good strategy for making your project impactful and manageable. From what you've shared, it looks like for your next activity some of the things you might brainstorm around include: 1) ways to reduce stress foster kids feel, 2) ways to demonstrate to foster kids that people care for them and are there for them and 3) ways to provide kids in foster care with people who will listen and communicate with them. We can't wait to see all of the creativity solutions you come up with next.
Nov 30
10
8Thanks for submitting a clear image of your work! We admire your compassion and empathy for this important issue. Brainstorming is the time you want to get really creative in thinking about your problem. Can you think up five more ways--really specific ideas--to meet each of the goals you identified? For example, maybe a way to promote positivity could be getting the youth involved in a community service project so they realize they have the power to make things better for someone? We don’t want to suggest any particular direction you should go in with your ideas and prototypes, but we encourage you to do a bit more brainstorming before you move on to prototyping since you’ll want to prototype and test a few different concepts to see what has the biggest impact.
Dec 21
20
16Thanks for taking the time to think about your design problem from a completely different perspective! Approaching problems in a new or unexpected way can lead you to creative ideas you wouldn't have thought of before. You did a good job coming up with some terrible ideas to "solve" your problem. Now can you flip that thinking around to generate some creative new ways to make things better?
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
8Thanks for sharing the sketch of your system! Have you made any progress in contacting a specific foster home/shelter? Focusing your energy on a single organization will definitely help your team create the most personalized solution possible. As we recall, your design challenge question was "How might we help teens at AIC get the things they need in order to make things easier for them?" How are you evaluating what the teens need? Are you speaking with them and the AIC staff? Where do the gaps exist in the service network for teens in foster care? And how can you structure your fundraising and giving program to best meet those needs? Remember, you want your design to be original and innovative--and to be based on your research, empathy, and understanding--so start to think of ways your program or service will be different from those that already exist.
Dec 21
10
Jan 11
20
8These are all thoughtful considerations. Since we haven't seen your prototypes, we're not sure how they represent an improvement to your prototype. Once you're finished your core project work--(all of your 10-point activities, like research, brainstorming, prototyping, and testing), come back and think about how you can use what you learned in this activity to take your design to the next level (and earn 8 more points)!
Jan 4
Jan 4
Thanks you sharing a picture of your experience! Did you watch the video of people trying this out on TV? You make a good point about it being reusable, but did anything unexpected happen while you tried to use it? Rigorous testing will help you ensure that your designs are effective, easy to understand, and easy to use. This is important, because you want your designs to solve a problem without causing new problems!
Jan 4
10
8Thanks for sharing this! Do you have any prototypes you'll test for to find out the best way you can help teens in foster care get what they need? For example, did you create a place where students can post a wish list and you can decide what is within your means to purchase? Or have you surveyed students to learn some common and low-cost items you could keep in stock somewhere the teens could access them? How much money will you need to do this, and how will you get that money? Are you doing this for teens in foster care who attend your school (since you're talking to your school counselors) or for teens at a particular shelter or in a particular program? Are you designing a system for purchasing and distributing goods, or are you designing a program for interacting with the people you want to help? How will you teach other students about your program? Will you develop materials to give students information on how they can get involved? These are some of the things you want to figure out so when you test your prototypes you can see what impact you are having and how well your ideas work.
Jan 11
10
Jan 18
10
Jan 25
20
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at, the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done!  Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years designing the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha VMAX motorcycle and Japan’s bullet trains, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll tell the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience your story?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, thinks about the spirit of the performance and the experience the audience will share.  How will you bring your story to life and connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 0 of 4

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

Puzzle Progress 4 of 6