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The Dreamchasers

About Us

The Dreamchasers come from Building 21 High School located in uptown in Philadelphia.  We are a group of individuals--intelligent students that like to have fun.  Also, we are all different in our own way.  For example, Tayon likes to cook and socialize; Lissett likes to do hair (braid); Sadie likes fashion design; Zakiyah is a sneakerhead; Isaiah likes to play basketball and he also likes to play video games.  Even though we are all chasing different dreams, we get along and work well together as a team.

Recent comments on our work:

1/25/19 · Assignment: The Outtakes
Tyquion Brittingham · The Dreamchasers
everyone says that they would like to do cereal day again because they don't like school lunch and it makes them feel like they're home. It was a good experience to do something different and something they like. hopefully we can do more different things for lunch or different thing we can add to the lunch.
1/24/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Jazmyne Williams · Monstars
Nice job!! We had fun doing this and its actually our favorite assignment. Keep up the good work!! There is nothing that we can really give you advice on but just know our are doing amazing. :)
1/24/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Alanna Figueroa · Delavietie
This is great, keep up the good work!
1/24/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Jasmine Salomon · N.O.
Nice job! I think it was very interesting to watch

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Way to go! All of the strategies you used to solve this puzzle--teamwork, thinking outside the box, persistence, and seeking help if you get stuck--are strategies that will come in handy during your DT Philly project. We're excited to see you apply your creative problem-solving skills to your DT Philly project.
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
15Welcome to DT Philly, and congratulations on being the first team to complete an activity this year! It sounds like you have a great team in place, and we look forward to meeting you next week. Thanks for coming back and uploading your team logo, and for including a bonus video. We liked your creative approach to your video. It was hard to hear some of your words over the music, but we get the gist of it.
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
1This doesn't look like it was taken at Drexel, but we admire your initiative in doing the activity back in your school. Most important, we know you understand how to attach pictures and submit your work for DT Philly. Thanks for practicing your creativity and making us smile with this fun picture!
Sep 28
10
10Isn't is amazing how many kinds of phone cases there are? And, as you point out, different ones work better for different people. Remember this lesson when you're working on your own project--understanding the needs and preferences of your audience will help you make decisions about what is important to include in your design. We hope this activity and talking about the designs on the accompanying cards also helped you understand that there is more than one way to achieve the same goal. This is another good thing to keep in mind when you're working on your DT Philly project.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Thanks for taking a walk in Jamal's shoes to understand how life is more complicated for people with dyslexia. How did it make you feel to try to read that text? Did you feel any pressure because it was hard to do it quickly? Understanding how a problem impacts people--the frustrations they have and the things they have to do to deal with the problem--is an important part of design research. Remember this, and think about how you could empathize with the people you're designing for in DT Philly!
Oct 5
10
10You're right...littering (and other things that people do) can have harmful consequences for the environment. Littering is a huge problem that affects people everywhere, so we're glad you recognized the importance of focusing on littering in a specific place for your DT Philly project. You'll find it's a lot easier to do good research and to test your prototypes by concentrating your efforts on the school yard. Does the littering in the school yard affect your school community as well? What positive things would come from solving this problem for the people who are around it all the time?
Oct 12
10
10We love the level of detail you put into your picture. Is it fair to assume you're going to focus on this problem at or around your school? If so, it might be interesting to see where littering occurs most often and what contributes to that. Learning more about the attitudes and behaviors of the students is also a good idea...we can't wait to see what you learn there! Changing people's behavior is challenging, but the more you learn about their habits and beliefs, the better you will be able to create an effective solution.
Nov 2
20
12Thank you for taking the time to create a user profile for your project. Understanding your users' needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people! Are you missing anyone who might be a user for your project? Maybe people who litter? Or people who clean up after the litterers? To earn more points, create a few more profiles that represent people you've spoken to or learned about who are affected by this problem.
Oct 19
Oct 19
We missed most of the changes when we watched for the first time, too. Now we both know how easy it is to miss something that's right in front of your eyes! Being a good observer is a great skill for a designer to have. This means paying attention to details, noticing things that other people don't, and seeing things with "new" eyes (letting go of assumptions and preconceived notions). Keep this in mind as you work on your project!
Oct 19
10
10Nice job capturing people's thoughts on littering around your school. It's interesting that so many of the students you spoke with admit to littering, and that so many also say they don't see a lot of trash around the school. How do you make sense of that? Do you think people feel the same way about a public space as they do about their personal space...for example, do the people who litter at school also leave trash on the floor in their homes? You might want to take some pictures and collect information to document your problem. For example, where is littering most visible at your school, and who or what could be causing it? If it's out in front of the school, is that trash that's blowing around the neigbhorhood on trash day or things that students are dropping? Does anyone clean up, or does the trash stay there until is disintegrates? Are there trash cans nearby? Littering is a problem all over the city, so you might be able to find some experts to speak with as well. You're off to a good start with your research--keep exploring and learning more!
Nov 2
10
6Are you switching away from the littering project to focus on school lunch? We know that providing students with healthy, tasty, and nourishing food is important, and that many students feel their school cafeterias don't meet that need. There are a lot of rules and systems involved with school lunch and breakfast, so if you are going to switch to this project you will have to do all new research to understand different aspects of this problem.
Nov 9
10
10Thank you for trying your hand at this year's Scavenver Hunt. We want to make sure you know how to access all of the resources available to you, so let's do a quick review of the ones highlighted in the scavenger hunt questions: 1) As you know, we give you feedback and suggestions on everything you turn in--you can find this by going to your team page and hovering over the name of any assignment you turn in. Our feedback is in the blue box that pops up. 2) Ms. Walsh has a booklet (there should be on in your activity box to) that explains how to do all of your design activities. 3) Looking at the work of other teams, as you did here, can give you ideas about how to do parts of your own project. 4) There are links in your big list of activities to videos that introduce each stage of your design project--watching them can help explain parts of the design process. The videos tell the story of a student design team that is trying to solve the problems that arise because their school does not have a library. 5) You can feel free to contact Ms. Jackson or Mr. Ferrarelli for help with your project. We'll let Ms. Jackson know what you're working on and see if she has some advice for you. 6) We put announcements or requests in the "notices" section of your team page...the pink box at the top of your team page). We encourage you to check this area from time to time and read the new announcements. We left you a few questionnaires that we'd love to have you answer if you can. Just for fun we also left a riddle there for your Scavenger Hunt!
Dec 7
20
20Nice work identifying a way you could strengthen your research. There's a lot to learn when trying to discover how school lunch can be improved. During your research, did you come across any complaints you hadn't thought of yet, or learn anything from the cafeteria staff that helps you understand where there are opportunities for change? Learning as many details as you can about students' lunch habits and complaints, and about how the cafeteria operates, will help you come up with a well-rounded and successful solution. Keep up the good work!
Nov 16
Nov 16
That was very creative! We love that you took the sketching a step farther and assembled people out of the different shapes. Way to think outside the box. This kind of creativity is a great skill to have and will help you come up with unique solutions to your DT Philly problem and to other challenges you encounter throughout your life.
Nov 16
10
10It looks like you moved quickly to come up with some information for your new topic--did you conduct a survey to find out what the top complaints about the school lunch are? And did you speak with the cafeteria staff to find out what their complaints are, and what they can control versus what is outside their control? You want to get detailed information that is more specific than "I don't like the food," because it's the details will help you figure out where you can make improvements that people will appreciate. Knowing what you might be able to control in partnership with the cafeteria staff and what you can't control because it comes from higher up in the school district will also help you see where you have opportunities for improvement. If we understand your notes correctly, it sounds like students in your school have some choice--they can bring lunch if they want, or they can eat the school lunch. Do a lot of students bring lunch instead of eating the school lunch? Your insights are interesting and could give you some fun things to brainstorm around like how to provide some kind of variety or choice, and how to give students a voice in this matter. Did you research the school district initiatives to improve lunch? As part of your research it might be interesting to see if any of those efforts are visible at your school and are having any impact.
Nov 30
10
10You did a good job identifying specific takeaways to brainstorm around! Do you think it might be helpful to dig a bit deeper and get more specific on some of your ideas? For example, you've starred the idea, "Make them taste good." What specific ideas do you have for that? It also sounds like your favorite ideas are ones you'll have to collaborate with cafeteria staff to prototype, so now might be a good time to go back and do some research with them to find out what's possible and what their perspectives are. One interesting thing about your idea of adding self-serve spices is that it would be a very visible change, and it would be easy to observe what happens during testing and what impact it has.
Dec 21
20
20Wow, those ideas would definitely make school lunch terrible! Now how can you flip your thinking about this problem to find new and creative ways to make lunch better (within the constraints of the school lunch program)? Sometimes wild ideas can lead you down the path to creative and outside-the-box ones!
Dec 7
Dec 7
Congratulations! Your tower looks great, and we hope you learned that the process of building helps you develop and try out different ideas to learn what works best. Remember this when you start prototyping for your DT Philly project!
Dec 14
10
10You're off to a great start on your two prototypes, and we're delighted that you're collaborating with the cafeteria manager to understand his perspective and get his buy-in for your next steps. It sounds like you have a good plan in place to plan cereal day, and we're excited to learn more details about how you will develop the S.L.A.B. prototype. How will students be able to join the board, and what will their responsibilities be? How often will you meet, and how will you communicate with district, school, and cafeteria staff? Once you work though all the details of how each of your prototypes will work, remember to identify anything you'll need to make in order to test your ideas (flyers, advertising, schedules, spice holder etc.). Keep up the good work!
Dec 21
10
10Thank you for taking the time to act out your prototype. Role playing is a great way to start thinking through how your solution might play out in real life, and anticipate where problems might arise. Do you foresee that S.L.A.B will individually interview students about food preferences, or is this something you'll do to supplement information you collect in other ways (we don't have permission to access your survey, so we're not sure what you're asking)? How will your team decide which students to interview? Your team has done a good job thinking about specific details that apply to your problem, such as taking allergies into consideration and having a metric by which to measure which cereals are acceptable. As you move forward, start to think about how you will test and evaluate the impact of your solution ideas. Is there anything you need to make? Do you need to contact anyone to get access to a Listserv so you can conduct surveys, or can you do them another way? Will you need any form for students to fill out? Will you need any signage to advertise the special events? How will the information you collect impact school lunch? The more details you work out, the better your solutions will be!
Jan 11
20
20We hope you had fun and found some inspiration in these design examples! Even small changes can make a design more thoughtful, enjoyable, or convenient, and you came up with some good ideas for making your prototype more enjoyable for students.. Do you think you'll actually try any of these ideas during your testing process?
Jan 4
Jan 4
Thanks for taking the time to test out this product! We hope your team sees how important it is to test your ideas and make sure they are effective, easy to use, and easy to understand. How will you make sure the designs you create don't miss the mark like this one did?
Jan 4
10
10Taking pictures and notes during testing is a good idea. What will you be looking for that will let you know how well your prototype works? You'll want to stay alert to everything that is going on while you test and try to capture as much feedback as possible--the feedback that supports your ideas, but also the feedback you can use to challenge your assumptions or improve your ideas. This would also be a good time to revisit the "why" of your original design challenge question, and gather the information or feedback that lets you know how effectively you are solving the problem you identified. It's not uncommon for teams to implement ideas that are interesting but don't necessarily solve the problem they set out to address. Also remember to get feedback from ALL of the people who make up the audience for your project. Is that just students, or does that include staff as well? We can't wait to see your ideas in action! And are you also planning to test the Student Lunch Advisory Board prototype?
Jan 11
10
10It sounds like you offered your classmates and fellow design team members a fun experience! Do you think being in a classroom instead of the lunchroom had any impact on the experience? And did students go to lunch as well, or did they come and eat cereal with you instead of going to lunch? Did you get any feedback about serving size or cereal options? Is there anything you learned that you could use to improve your design? How could this prototype operate on a larger scale? We think your idea is that cereal day would be one special event in a series of special events designed to make lunch more satisfying and enjoyable for students. What would a plan for that system look like? How often would special events happen, who would decide what they are, and where would the food come from? Is S.L.A.B. a part of this system? S.L.A.B. sounded like a promising way to keep the lines of communication open about improving the school lunch experience, but we're not sure if it's still part of your project. Keep up the good work!
Jan 18
10
10Your team has done a great job prototyping and testing in a limited amount of time! It sounds like people really enjoyed your cereal day, and your team did a good job navigating problems that popped up. It also sounds like your prototype did more than address your initial concern with lunch...it also promoted a sense of community between students and staff, and it got people excited about lunch time! Did testing your idea on a larger scale teach you anything about how to create a program of special lunch events? What do you need in order to build upon this initial event so it can continue into the future? Maybe a schedule, a planning committee (does that need to include staff as well as students), and ideas about potential themes (or are you sticking with cereal)? Are you also working on the idea for a student lunch advisory board ? That was also another intriguing idea you had. Let us know if you need any help, and keep up the great work!
Jan 25
20
20Thank you for taking the time to give some other teams encouragement and feedback. You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Asking questions is a good way to help a team see where they could explain their project better or see a detail they may have overlooked. Keep sharing your own work and supporting your fellow design thinkers on other teams!
Jan 25
For your presentation, it will be important to tell your design story in a clear and compelling way to the audience. Including details about the process and roadblocks you faced throughout is a great way to do this! Be sure to include some of these outtakes in your presentation (as time permits) to give the judges a deeper insight into your team's experience!.
Jan 28
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Feb 4
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Feb 4
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Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at, the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done!  Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years designing the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha VMAX motorcycle and Japan’s bullet trains, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll tell the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience your story?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, thinks about the spirit of the performance and the experience the audience will share.  How will you bring your story to life and connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 1 of 4

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!