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The Future

About Us

We are the Future, we a group located in Wyncote, Pennsylvania. We are group of motivated and intelligent high school students who are looking forward to making a change in our community. We also like to have fun, like playing sports and listening to music. Zahmier enjoys playing Football, Chris likes running track, Frank enjoys wrestling and playing on the varsity football team, and Caitryn likes to run track and play soccer. Ian likes to play football, the other Chris finds entertainment in watching football, and Jason loves to live life and have fun. Although we all aspire to do different things with our lives, and have different hobbies, we work well together and come up with some great ideas!

Recent comments on our work:

10/4/18 · Assignment: Mini Design Sprint
Caitryn Donofry · The Future
Last week, we collaborated with Ms. Williams and Ms. Galpin from compete 360. We created a prototype for the problem with kids that kept sliding down railings of staircases. We sped up the design process into a class period, we learned all the things we will have to do for our design challenge. We are very happy that the women from Compete 360 came because we got a better understanding of what we will do in the future for our Design Thinking project.
10/4/18 · Assignment: Meet the Team
Jason Bashiru · The Future
As a future member I do not know what it takes to make this post look true but I will try to fulfill my duty as a future member

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! We're excited that you're joining us this year, and we can't wait to see what you'll do for your project. It's great to have a team made up of people with different interests--that means you'll have the benefit of different skills and different perspectives in your design work.
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
10NIce work with your drawings and explanations--we love the thought and detail you put into these, and we would definitely love to have a lifeproof case! People are always trying to improve upon phone case design...this one actually does have things that pop out to protect your phone when it falls: https://www.techradar.com/news/this-crazy-case-design-is-like-an-airbag-for-your-smartphone. We hope this activity and talking about the designs on the accompanying cards helped you understand that there is more than one way to achieve the same goal. This is a good thing to keep in mind when you're working on your DT Philly project. Also remember the needs of your audience when you're doing your design project. Their needs and preferences will help you make important decisions about what to include in your design.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
Oct 12
10
4Nice job with your rich picture! It's a little blurry, so we couldn't read everything, but we can read enough to see how you're identifying the ways your problem impacts different people, and the relationships between everything that's talking place. Did you also do a research plan? If so, please submit it to earn 4 more points for this activity. Comfort in the classroom is such an interesting challenge...why do you think the chairs are so uncomfortable now? Is there possible a practical reason for that? And how could you learn about what kinds of seating might be more comfortable yet still encourage productivity in the classroom?
Nov 2
20
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
8These are some interesting observations and theories. If the manufacturer wasn't thinking about comfort, what do you think their priorities were? Are there reasons school chairs would be made the way they are? As part of your research, it might be interesting to find out when the furniture was purchased and how the school or district decides what to purchase. There are a lot of studies out there about anthropometry (body size/proportion measurement) and school furniture!
Nov 2
10
Nov 9
10
Dec 7
20
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
8Thank you for showing how different people are dealing with and thinking about your problem. Did your research reveal any problems besides the hardness of the seats? For example, in an earlier assignment you pointed out that desks are all the same size, but students aren't. And when we visited, we noticed that your desks and seats are attached, which means you can't adjust your distance from the desk. If we remember correctly, the seat backs are also very rigid. It might be helpful to observe or survey students to document all of the problems you have...for example, do larger students have trouble getting into the seats? What do students do now to try to get more comfortable at the desks (for example, using coats for cushioning, sitting in different positions, etc.)? Taking pictures (with the permission of the people in the pictures) is a great way to document problems and will come in helpful when you make your presentation at the end of your project. Some of the behaviors you observed, like getting out of the seats and sitting on window sills (which we're guessing aren't really softer than the chairs) can also give you important insights for addressing your problem. Is this a sign of additional problems, such as students being restless from sitting all day?
Nov 30
10
10Thank you for submitting pictures of your brainstorming. The hardess of the seats is definitely one feature that makes the chairs uncomfortable. Are there other themes you could brainstorm around to increase students' comfort? For example, does the shape of the chair impact students' comfort? Do students feel cramped or constrained by the design of the chair/desk? Does the furniture suit the way you work in class if you do small group work? During brainstorming, you want to think as broadly as possible about your problem and potential solutions, so we encourage you to consider a variety of options in addition to seat cushions. After you look at the big picture and all of the possibilities, you will zero in on a few specific solutions you want to build and test.
Dec 21
20
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
Dec 21
10
Jan 11
20
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
Jan 11
10
Jan 18
10
Jan 25
20
Jan 25
Jan 25
10
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at, the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done!  Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years designing the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha VMAX motorcycle and Japan’s bullet trains, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll tell the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience your story?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, thinks about the spirit of the performance and the experience the audience will share.  How will you bring your story to life and connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 1 of 4

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!

Puzzle Progress 2 of 6