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7A+

About Us

Bonjour! Our group is called 7A+ and we are an Asian group that contains 6 girls and 1 boy. Also we live in North Philly. We are in different classes but we still get along. Just saying we all are dysfunctional. Other than that, we're pretty ''normal''. We have different opinions most of the time but we always end up agreeing on things. We look forward into working with each other on this project. MEET THE MEMBERS; Sally is the kid, Christine is the mom of the group, Chaimongkon is the artist, Tabitha is more mature than the rest of us, Felicity is the clueless one, Aliyah is the calm one, and Angelina is the serious one.... GOOD DAY!

Recent comments on our work:

1/22/18 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Rashay Saunders · Mighty Morphin Power Designers
We are giving you the Mr. Clean Award for your idea!
1/22/18 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Rashay Saunders · Mighty Morphin Power Designers
I liked the way you thought of a way to help trash get into the trash can. We have cleaners in the building who are students, but they play around. Yours would be better. Have you thought about not making it talk, but flash messages, like a screen or something? it could say good job or Thank you or a number for the next reward. Good luck!!!
12/18/17 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Tabitha Lam · 7A+
We thought we made this to share
12/18/17 · Assignment: Genius At Work
Gina Griffith · The Black Power Puff Girls, Out Smarters, 7A+, Cookies and Creme, The Fabulous 5, TropicalZZZ
See lower, work is attached
1/18/18 · Assignment: Fresh Perspectives
Rashay Saunders · Mighty Morphin Power Designers
good job
1/9/18 · Assignment: Design Challenges & How Might We...
Khyle Thompson · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC
You guys really are the bomb! This technique is extremely awesome!

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Oct 31
Sep 29
10
10Bienvenue a DT Philly! We're excited to see the great work your team will do this year, and we think the diverse personalities on your team will help you be creative problem solvers!
Oct 6
10
10Thank you for these great examples and your thoughtful comments and explanations! There's a good chance the prototypes you develop for your design project this year will fall into one of these categories of design.
Oct 31
20
20Thanks for having us out to do a mini design sprint with you. You worked fast & well in this quick overview of how you can use the steps of design thinking to solve a problem or make something new.
Oct 27
Oct 13
10
10Excellent job identifying and considering a variety of possible design challenges! The pollution and the environment is a really big project to take on, so it might be helpful to focus your design challenge on a specific environmental problem in a specific location that is close to you. This will make it a lot easier for you to prototype your solution ideas and test them to see if they work. Do you know what outcome you would like to achieve--or what improvement you would like your solution to achieve? And is there a location in or near your school where you can address this problem? For example, if you wanted to focus on littering, you might write a more specific problem statement like this: How might we reduce littering on the sidewalks and grounds around our school in order to reduce the negative impacts of trash on our environment (or to improve the environmental health and beauty of our school...or whatever your goal is). I wonder if different types of trash have different impacts on the environment?
Oct 20
10
6You've identified a lot of important parts of the environment that are affected by pollution. Do you have a specific place where you want to address this problem--somewhere at or close to the school, maybe? And are you focusing on one particular kind of pollution (littering, or water pollution, or something else)? Making your project a bit more focused will help keep it manageable and also help you figure out what kind of research you need to do. Maybe you need to find out why people litter, or what kinds of litter are the biggest problem in the area where you're doing your project, etc. You'll want to do a lot of research before you start coming up with solutions, otherwise you may find that your solution doesn't solve your problem! Don't forget to upload your research plan to earn 4 more points for this activity.
Oct 27
20
20We commend you for going back and creating user profiles for your project--good job! These profiles all describe people who want to help with environmental concerns--it would be great if everyone felt this way! This makes us curious to know more about your project. Do you want to design only for people who are motivated to make a difference and help the environment? If you do, then you're on the right track! If you also want your design to address the needs of people who don't know any better or don't think they care much about the environment, then you might want to think about their actions, attitudes, and motivations, too. There is no right or wrong answer--it's more a question of what you want to accomplish.
Nov 17
Oct 27
10
8We're sorry you can't see the Designer Directory. We moved it to another place where you should be able to find it now. Look under your My Account menu on the main menu bar, then select the word Resources. When the Resources page pops up, scroll down to the section called Document Downloads. A copy of the Designer Directory is saved there. Mrs. Griffith also has a paper copy of it.
Nov 3
10
8Great job using different research strategies! Did you actually observe an area in or near the school to see how much littering or pollution is present, or are you relying on memories? Doing deep research is an important part of designing good solutions. It also sounds like you are still focused on pollution on a global scale. That's admirable, but it would be extremely difficult to solve the problem on a large scale in the course of this DT Philly project. Is there one specific place in or near the school where you can focus on littering or pollution? This will allow you to prototype and test solution ideas to evaluate what really works and what does not.
Nov 9
10
10You captured some good observations on your empathy map! We would suggest rewriting your takeaways to be needs or goals you can find many ways to address...for example, the need or goal around painting over graffiti and having a campaign to make America beautiful again might be "keep the area clean" or "address problems quickly" so people become used to seeing a clean environment instead of a littered or graffitied envrionment which makes it seem like no one cares and it doesn't matter it you do those thing. Then you could brainstorm around all the ways to keep the area clean and address problems quickly...like having a "clean team" that responds to problems the same day they are reported (in which case you would also need some system of monitoring and reporting). What other ways could you respond quickly to problems? Maybe the takeaway for your comments about littering damaging the earth and warning people about the effects of smoking and pollution is that your solution should educate people or increase awareness. Then you could come up with lots of ideas about how to help people understand the impacts of those things. And maybe the takeaway from your comment that people should pick up after themselves if they miss the trash can is that your solution should make people care, or get people to be more responsible for their own behavior. Then you could come up with lots of ideas for how you encourage people to change their behavior. What kinds of things influence the way someone behaves?
Nov 17
20
20Thanks for watching this video and learning about some of the dangers of shallow research. Has your research helped you understand why people litter? Learning about people's habits, motivations, and attitudes will help you come up with solution ideas that work. Dig deep!
Dec 8
These are great--way to get creative! Being able to see everyday things in new ways is a great skill to use in the Ideate phase of your project work. Keep this in mind as you start brainstorming solutions ideas that address the needs and goals you've identified.
Nov 17
10
10You did a great job identifying different levels of outcomes your solution could achieve--from the more practical and feasible to the things that are much more ambitious and might be harder to achieve. Changing attitudes--making people care about the environment in their community--it a great goal (and a high level one!). We have been noticing that your project scope is extremely broad. It is going to be very difficult to prototype and test a few solution ideas that address everything from littering to air pollution to smoking, to alternative energy sources and more. For the purposes of this year's DT Philly project, we recommend that you focus on one type of environmental problem you experience in or near your school. This will allow you to experiment with solution ideas to see what makes a difference. You can always can work on other environmental problems for future projects!
Dec 1
10
8Thanks for sharing all of this information about pollution--it's clear that you care a great deal about this topic! The goal of the Genius at Work activity is to brainstorm LOTS of different ways to address your particular problem in the area where you want to address it. Pollution is a very broad topic and happens in a lot of places. Can you pick one aspect of pollution (for example, littering, or illegal dumping) and one place you want to address it (for example, in front of the school, or in a specific vacant lot). This might help you focus your brainstorming and generate lots more ideas for ways to approach your problem.
Dec 8
20
20Thanks for submitting these fun pictures--we are impressed with your creativity and artistic skills! You selected a very broad range of environmental concerns for your DT Philly project. Focusing in on one very specific problem and understanding how it plays out in one very specific place might help you discover insights into human behavior that you can use to prototype a potential solution. Focusing on a specific problem in a specific place that you have access to (for example, littering in front of the school, or reducing the amount of waste going into trash cans in the cafeteria) means you will be able to try out your solution ideas, evaluate how well they work, and improve them.
Jan 5
Dec 8
10
8These trash can toppers look like a lot of fun! Do they all have an interactive component? Having holiday editions so the look changes from time to time in an interesting idea...we wonder if that might help you keep interest up And we're curious about the desktop model--is this a different approach to solving the problem? We're not sure what you learned from researching littering in your school--where do you find most of it? What kind of trash is it? Are there enough trash cans? Do they fill up or overflow at some point during the day? Do kids place their trash in the receptacle or toss it in? (If they toss it in, what do you need to take into consideration when designing the lid?) Understanding these things will help you design your prototypes!
Dec 15
10
6Very nice! (And thanks for coming back to share your work.) Using humor is a good way to engage people, and thanking people is always appropriate. We're curious about your second prototype idea...would this be something that a janitor or a volunteer would use, or would it be near the trash can so if somone misses the can with their trash they can use this tool to pick it up? Making things more fun to do and/or easier to do are good ways to get people to participate. Have you ever seen this video of Volkswagen's bottomless trash can? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcrhp-IWK2w Earn 4 more points for this activity when you share a picture of another rapid prototype you developed (your goal is to make and test at least 2 different prototypes).
Dec 22
10
10It's a good idea to put your prototype in a place where you can keep an eye on it. Both to make sure it doesn't get vandalized, but also to be able to see if it makes a difference in the amount of litter in the hallway. Do you have some data from before you put your prototype out so you can see if it makes a difference?
Jan 12
20
Wow--the ideas are really flowing!!! Getting feedback is a great way to see what users find appealing about your design. To get credit for Professional Practice, please schedule a design critique with Compete 360 staff or a professional designer from our Designer Directory. If you choose to contact someone from the Designer Directory and they are not able to visit your school in person, you can set up a video chat for your design critique.
Jan 19
Jan 5
10
10Thank you for taking the time to send a High 5 to the Edison Owls. We appreciate your sharing your thoughtful and encouraging words with them, and we're sure they appreciate it, too!
Jan 12
10
10It sounds like you got a lot of great feedback from testing your prototypes--nice job! It's o.k. to fake some of the functions you want in your design when you're experimenting with prototypes. For example, you could record some of the messages you want the trash can to play, and trigger the recording on a computer when you see someone throwing their trash away. This would help your users understand what would happen with a talking trash can. We have had some teams bring some pretty big prototypes to the DT Philly event, but talk to Mrs. Griffiths about what is possible.
Jan 19
20
8Thank you for taking the time to review the work of a fellow design team! Your comments and badge are encouraging. Can you also think of a constructive comment or question that would help them improve their project? This will allow you to earn 8 more points for this activity.
Jan 29
Jan 19
10
10Thank you for turning in your essay, budget, and implementation plan. We know you've been working hard on your project this year--keep it up! If you need any help this week as you get ready for your presentation, please let us know. We look forward to seeing you at the ballpark on January 30!
Jan 29
10
10Nice work--your slides look great, and we love the minion trash can! Will you be bringing that with you? It would make a great visual for your presentation! Thanks for all of your hard work this year. We can't wait to see you at the ballpark.
Jan 29
20
20It's a great idea to practice your presentation in front of an audience, and we're glad they had some helpful feedback for you! Were you able to finish in under 5 minutes? The more you practice, the better and more comfortable you will be. We know you will do great!
Sep 28

Badges

Start Up- Zeroll Badge

Congratulations!  You're starting to see things with a designer's eye.  Great design comes from moments of discovery such as noticing a problem or an opportunity.  Sherman Kelly did just that in 1933 when he noticed a young ice cream server who had blisters on her hands from dishing out hard ice cream.  Kelly designed a new scoop made of cast aluminum that had fluid in the handle to transfer heat from a person's hand. This feature lightly softened the ice cream, making it easier to scoop.  In addition, the scoop efficiently rolled the ice cream into balls and did not have breakable parts.  The Zeroll scoop is one of the best in the business.  You can even find one on display in New York’s Museum of Modern Art!

Empathy- Better Shelter Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes!  Designers empathize deeply to understand the people they are helping, just as Ikea and Better Shelter did when they set out to create safer and more dignified housing for refugees.  The resulting "flat pack" shelter can be assembled by 4 people in just 4 hours, is built to last three years, and features durable walls for privacy, windows for light, a locking door for security, and a solar panel that powers an overhead light and can charge a cell phone. Also, the ceiling is high enough to allow a person to stand up straight.  Over 16,000 units have been distributed, and the shelter won the Design Museum of London's Beazley Design of the Year award in 2016. 

Define - Woodland and Silver Badge:

Nice work!  Research requires patience and persistence.  Just ask Norman Woodland and Bernard Silver, who were working and studying at Drexel in 1948 when they overheard a supermarket owner ask the school president for help developing an automated system to read product information at checkout.  They settled on a design—the barcode—resembling linear Morse code and obtained a patent in 1952.  But it took much more work over many years before their vision could be fully realized, and it was in 1974 that the first product—chewing gum—was scanned at checkout.

Ideate - AP Thailand Badge:

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see everyday things or experiences with new eyes, but that's exactly what AP Thailand, a real estate company, did in a crowded neighborhood in Bangkok where there was no room to build soccer fields.  AP Thailand literally thought outside the box and designed non-traditional fields to fit into spaces that were considered unusable.  These unusual soccer fields are a hit with residents who now have a place to play their favorite sport.

Prototype - C.B.E. Badge:

Far out!  Drinking out of a cup is something we take for granted, but in space, nothing is simple.  Until recently, astronauts have had to drink from tubes inserted into special beverage pouches.  Then, some engineers came up with an idea for a specially-shaped cup that uses principles of physics to keep liquid from floating away in the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station.  In 2015, astronauts on the ISS began using 3D printed prototypes of the cup as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment (C.B.E.).

Test - Waymo Badge:

Now you get the picture…testing is very important!  How else will you know that your idea solves your problem (and doesn’t cause unintended consequences)?  In 2009 Google began testing concepts for a self-driving car, beginning with a retrofitted Prius operating on rural roads.  As their design evolved, their testing became more sophisticated, moving onto highways and then to more complex urban environments.  The self-driving car project, which Google spun off as an independent company called Waymo, has advanced its design so far that they are now conducting a public test of self-driving cars with residents of Phoenix, AZ.

DT Philly - StoryCorps Badge:

Hooray—you are on your way to getting your story out!  You want your audience to empathize with the people you are designing for, and to understand the steps, goals, and outcomes of your design process and solution.  Take a page from StoryCorps, an organization that collects and shares stories to help people understand one another’s experiences and perspectives.  Story Corps uses audio recordings, pictures, and animations to bring stories to life.  How will you tell the story of your project?

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

Collaborator Badge