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Dynamic Developers

About Us

The Dynamic Developers are a team of 8th grade students (Jahir, Maleah, Jamar, Ezekiel, Akai and Kya) at Longstreth Elementary School who are looking to make a change in the school. Many of them have been at the school since elementary, and therefore have a long relationship with the school. They are also good friends and work well together. They are ready for the Design Thinking Challenge!  

 

Recent comments on our work:

1/11/18 · Assignment: Next Steps
Cedric Zellars · Minerva, The H2Os
Does it make a lot of noise when you fall backwards? And does if it does is it loud or distracting?
1/3/18 · Assignment: Next Steps
Matthew Marson · Team Stoup
i think its a good idea good job.
1/9/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Michael Carr · The H2Os
i think this is a really god idea so kids do not lose their writing/drawing materials i hope you guys make it far in the competition so you can accomplish your idea because I think your idea is amazing keep up the good work. -The H2O
1/18/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Michael Carr · The H2Os
You guys deserve the good thinker award/badge
1/18/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Michael Carr · The H2Os
You guys deserve the good thinker award/badge
1/11/18 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Michael Carr · The H2Os
To The Dynamic Developers i think this is a really god idea so kids do not lose their writing/drawing materials i hope you guys make it far in the competition so you can accomplish your idea because I think your idea is amazing keep up the good work. -The H2Os
1/3/18 · Assignment: Good, Better Best
Matthew Marson · Team Stoup
i think its best that the teacher let them walk i the classroom and pick out their own chair. this is very good. do you think students will start to attend to class more often.
1/18/18 · Assignment: Dig Deep
Rashay Saunders · Mighty Morphin Power Designers
good job
1/26/18 · Assignment: Field Notes
Darlington Monegro · Los Platanos
I think you guys did a good thing but i feel that you guys should talk to you guys principle so he can get better chairs.I am giving you guys the Caring badge.
1/18/18 · Assignment: Fresh Perspectives
Rashay Saunders · Mighty Morphin Power Designers
good job

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Oct 31
Nice work! The more you do this the more ideas you'll come up with--try it from time to time and see! Or sub in other items you have in your classroom. We love your ideas for the bag!
Sep 29
10
15Welcome to DT Philly! We're excited to meet you and see the great work you will do this year.
Oct 6
10
10These are some very creative ideas you came up with to illustrate different types of design! Teachers might love it if kids had the Longstreth phone! Remember these different types of design as you work your way through your DT Philly project...it's quite likely that the prototypes you develop will fall into these categories of design.
Oct 31
20
20Thanks for having us out today! Make sure you remember all the tools we discussed today as you move forward with your design projects over the course of DT Philly.
Oct 27
Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes! Understanding the experiences and perspectives of others is an important part of the design process! What steps will you take to make sure you understand the people you are designing for?
Oct 13
10
10You've identified quite a few problems--and thanks for all the pictures! People come in all different shapes and sizes, and have different preferences with regard to what makes them comfortable. We can't wait to see what you learn in your research! Do you know of any public places where lots of people use the same seats but the seats work better than what you have in school? Are there certain characteristics a chair has to have to work well in a classroom? Is it possible to fix the broken chairs to make them useful again? There's so much you could learn about this problem!
Oct 20
10
10You made a very interesting observation about how you have choices of seating at home...why are there so many different kinds of seating in different places--even in one home? It might be fun to speak with an industrial designer to learn more!
Oct 27
20
20It might be useful to focus at this point on different types of users in your classroom, instead of people in all kinds of different professions. Are all of the students in your class the same--do they do the same things, have the same concerns or needs, share the same physical charateristics? Or are there differences between how students who are too big for the chairs behave, and students who are too small for the chairs, and students who are the right size for the chairs? Or, regardless of size, do some groups of students behave differently from others when they are using the chairs? Understanding similarities and differences between different types of users will help you create a solution that works for more people.
Nov 17
Oct 27
10
8Take your time when you're doing your activities to make sure you understand what you're dong (ask Mr. Rocco for help!). Have you begun your project research?
Nov 3
10
10It sounds like you learned a lot while doing your research. We're very curious about the different types of chairs you named! Did you talk to the principal about where the chairs come from, or why companies make those kinds of chairs for schools? Maybe now would be a good time to contact one of our volunteer designers to learn more about chair design.
Nov 9
10
10It sounds like people have strong opinions about the chairs! Your takeaways should focus on needs and goals you want your solution to address. "Make it better" is a bit too vague (better in what way?), and "have a cup holder" or "put pillows on them" is a bit too specific--these are things that might come up in brainstorming rather than in takeaways. It sounds like there might be some time that gets wasted when kids come into a room and are trying to get the chair they want. Is this a problem? If so, a takeaway might be that your solution should help students get seated quickly. Then you can brainstorm ways to speed up the process of getting students into their preferred chair. Are there enough chairs that are the right size for different-sized students? If not, is that a need or a goal? It sounds like one goal is definitely to increase student comfort...that might even generate some ideas that have nothing to do with sitting! Are there any needs or goals you can identify from the perspective of the school or the staff--anything about safety or behavior? Or any needs around the durability, cost, storage, and/or maintenance of furniture that gets a lot of use in an environment like a classroom?
Nov 17
20
20Thanks for watching this video and learning about some of the dangers of shallow research. It's a great habit to check your work and identify places you can go further in your research to make sure you fully understand different needs, wishes, and constraints. Learning about these things will help you come up with solution ideas that work well. It sounds like one of the things you're looking at is how to get students into the best chairs for them in any given classroom setting. If we're understanding that correctly, might it be helpful to understand different teachers' preferences and routines for having students arrive, depart, and get settled in for class?
Dec 8
5Thanks for tweeting at us with your Hidden Faces pictures. We hope you had fun with this activity!
Nov 17
10
10We can't read all of your Post-it Notes because your photo is a bit blurry, but it sounds like you might be distinguishing between matching students up to chairs that are already there and that best fit them, adding cushioning to existing chairs, and developing new chairs. Is that accurate? Are there any factors besides cushioning that contribute to chair comfort?
Dec 1
10
10You do have a lot of different considerations--especially since comfort is such a personal issue. Brainstorming around all of these issues is a great way to figure out what you want to prototype--from a very practical solution like getting students into the right chairs given the options you already have (and keeping those chairs available by fixing them when they break), to coming up with new seating options. Can you draw inspiration from the ways people personalize or improve the comfort of kitchen or patio chairs you might see in someone's home? Don't forget to consider the environment in which your solution has to work, and the purpose of the chairs--these inform design decisions. A chair for learning and doing school work that is used by many students all day long might have different characteristics than a chair for lounging or watching movies.
Dec 8
20
20Nice work--these are excellent points to consider as you move ahead with your design ideas. And we like your creative interpretation of the clouds--your bird looks like it came straight out of a Dr. Seuss book!
Jan 5
This looks like so much fun! How many tries did it take to get it to work the way you wanted? We hope you enjoyed this activity and that it helps you see that perseverence is important in prototyping--it can take many tries before you achieve success.
Dec 8
10
10These are some of the most creative chair ideas we've seen, and we appreciate your labeling the important features of your designs--that's a great habit to use when sketching! Are you thinking these chairs would come in different sizes to address the needs of different sized students? As you think about how to bring your ideas to life, it might be a good idea to consult one of the professionals listed in our designer directory. They might be able to help you explore some practical considerations with regard to ergonomics and comfort. We also encourage you to think about what attributes are important given the environment in which your chair design must work. Do the chairs have to be stackable or be able to go up on a desk so the janitor can clean? Do they have to be durable to resist stains or wear and tear--do you know any public places that have seating that might inspire your thinking?
Dec 15
10
10These are very interesting! The ground chair looks like it solves the problem with the chairs being different heights...we'll be curious to hear if it achieves your goal of making students more comfortable! Your supply box model got us thinking...where do students currently keep their supplies? If they carry them in their backpacks, would they transfer them to the box for class period or is this something teachers would keep filled for the students? Keep refining your ideas as you think through how your prototypes solve your design challenge! It can also be helpful at this point to revisit your earlier project work to make sure you're still working toward your desired outcomes (or if you're not, it's because your research pointed you in a different direction).
Dec 22
10
10These are good observations about your prototypes, and good thoughts about how to refine them to address some of your concerns. Testing will help you figure out your next steps. If after testing you feel like you're hitting a wall with regard to developing a prototype that works well without potentially introducing new problems or complications, don't be afraid to take a fresh look at things and try something new. Lot of designers do this! Keep in mind the original problem you set out to address and some of the insights you uncovered along the way.
Jan 12
20
20We're delighted that you took this opportunity to participate in a design review and get some feedback on your work! It sounds like you got some good pointers. We have a question for you...is this chair designed to work at a desk, like a standard classroom chair?
Jan 19
Jan 5
10
10Thank you for taking the time to send a high 5 to Los Platanos and to the Gladiators! We appreciate your spreading your positivity to your fellow DT Philly teams, and we're sure they appreciate it, too.
Jan 12
10
10It's exciting to hear about all of the testing you've been doing--what a great way to learn what works best and what could be improved! Your user's question about whether the camper chair would be available in different sizes reminds us of the starting point for this project--you have different sized students, and different sized chairs, so how do you ensure that every student ends up in the chair that best fits them? Or, if they travel with the students, what happens at the end of the day if students' last class is not in the same room as their first class the next day? Did any students or teachers think it was not a great idea to carry the chairs from room to room (if so, why)? We're also wondering if this is supposed to be a desk chair. If not, what are students doing for a work surface?
Jan 19
20
20Thank you for taking the time to review the work of your fellow design teams. We love your creative badge ideas and appreciate your coming back to offer more structured comments.
Jan 29
Jan 19
10
10Thanks for turning in your essay, budget, and implementation plan. We know you've worked hard on your project--keep it up! As you get ready for your presentation, remember what we talked about last week when we visited, and feel free to contact us if you have questions or need assistance. We look forward to seeing you at the ballpark on January 30!
Jan 29
10
10Nice job! You have great pictures that illustrate your problem and your project--and visuals are important! You do have a lot of slides--22 for a 5 minute talk. You're going to have to move through these quickly--every 10 seconds or so, to show all of them. So remember to keep moving along or you'll run out of time and be stopped in the middle of your presentation. We're also not sure how the drawing Mr. Spain made for you fits in with your final design. It looks like you intend to design and build that chair, but the items you have included in your budget do not reflect that. What is your proposed solution?
Jan 29
20
20We're glad you took the time to practice your presentation in front of an audience. If some of your team members don't want to talk, that's o.k.--leave it up to the people who are happy to talk! (Just make sure you work it all out and practice what will happen so things go smoothly.) We look forward to seeing you next week, and we're delighted to hear that you're proud of your work and are excited to see your fellow design teams.
Sep 28

Badges

Start Up- Zeroll Badge

Congratulations!  You're starting to see things with a designer's eye.  Great design comes from moments of discovery such as noticing a problem or an opportunity.  Sherman Kelly did just that in 1933 when he noticed a young ice cream server who had blisters on her hands from dishing out hard ice cream.  Kelly designed a new scoop made of cast aluminum that had fluid in the handle to transfer heat from a person's hand. This feature lightly softened the ice cream, making it easier to scoop.  In addition, the scoop efficiently rolled the ice cream into balls and did not have breakable parts.  The Zeroll scoop is one of the best in the business.  You can even find one on display in New York’s Museum of Modern Art!

Empathy- Better Shelter Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes!  Designers empathize deeply to understand the people they are helping, just as Ikea and Better Shelter did when they set out to create safer and more dignified housing for refugees.  The resulting "flat pack" shelter can be assembled by 4 people in just 4 hours, is built to last three years, and features durable walls for privacy, windows for light, a locking door for security, and a solar panel that powers an overhead light and can charge a cell phone. Also, the ceiling is high enough to allow a person to stand up straight.  Over 16,000 units have been distributed, and the shelter won the Design Museum of London's Beazley Design of the Year award in 2016. 

Define - Woodland and Silver Badge:

Nice work!  Research requires patience and persistence.  Just ask Norman Woodland and Bernard Silver, who were working and studying at Drexel in 1948 when they overheard a supermarket owner ask the school president for help developing an automated system to read product information at checkout.  They settled on a design—the barcode—resembling linear Morse code and obtained a patent in 1952.  But it took much more work over many years before their vision could be fully realized, and it was in 1974 that the first product—chewing gum—was scanned at checkout.

Ideate - AP Thailand Badge:

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see everyday things or experiences with new eyes, but that's exactly what AP Thailand, a real estate company, did in a crowded neighborhood in Bangkok where there was no room to build soccer fields.  AP Thailand literally thought outside the box and designed non-traditional fields to fit into spaces that were considered unusable.  These unusual soccer fields are a hit with residents who now have a place to play their favorite sport.

Prototype - C.B.E. Badge:

Far out!  Drinking out of a cup is something we take for granted, but in space, nothing is simple.  Until recently, astronauts have had to drink from tubes inserted into special beverage pouches.  Then, some engineers came up with an idea for a specially-shaped cup that uses principles of physics to keep liquid from floating away in the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station.  In 2015, astronauts on the ISS began using 3D printed prototypes of the cup as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment (C.B.E.).

Test - Waymo Badge:

Now you get the picture…testing is very important!  How else will you know that your idea solves your problem (and doesn’t cause unintended consequences)?  In 2009 Google began testing concepts for a self-driving car, beginning with a retrofitted Prius operating on rural roads.  As their design evolved, their testing became more sophisticated, moving onto highways and then to more complex urban environments.  The self-driving car project, which Google spun off as an independent company called Waymo, has advanced its design so far that they are now conducting a public test of self-driving cars with residents of Phoenix, AZ.

DT Philly - StoryCorps Badge:

Hooray—you are on your way to getting your story out!  You want your audience to empathize with the people you are designing for, and to understand the steps, goals, and outcomes of your design process and solution.  Take a page from StoryCorps, an organization that collects and shares stories to help people understand one another’s experiences and perspectives.  Story Corps uses audio recordings, pictures, and animations to bring stories to life.  How will you tell the story of your project?

You’re on fire!  Great job taking advantage of your resources in the DT Philly design community.

Achiever Badge