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Team Athena

About Us

Hi. We are Team Athena.  Our team members are Jadyn, 8th grade, Cameron, 7th grade, Sidney, 7th grade, and Jared, 7th grade.  We are a group of optimistic and intelligent individuals.  Some of the things we want to be when we are older are a Marine Biologist, a Video Game Designer, and a Doctor.  We enjoy creating things with simple materials such as rubber bands, chopsticks, and pipe cleaners.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Oct 31
Sep 29
10
6Welcome to DT Philly! It sounds like you have some big plans for the future. We look forward to seeing the great work you will do this year! Don't forget to upload an image for your team logo to earn your last four points for this activity.
Oct 6
10
6Thank you for this good example of industrial design! Don't forget to upload examples of interior, experience, and system design to earn four more points for this activity!
Oct 31
20
20Thanks for having us out for your mini design sprint. When you do your actual DT Philly project, remember the strategies we discussed for research, brainstorming, prototyping, and testing!
Oct 27
Oct 13
10
Oct 20
10
8Thanks for submitting your rich picture and research plan. The photos are a bit blurry, so we're not sure what your rich picture is describing, but it looks like you identified a lot of different people who are affected by your challenge. Please take a minute to submit your "how might we" question that describes your design challenge so we know what you are working on (and so you can get points for that activity--include your "design challenges around you" if you have it).
Oct 27
20
Nov 17
Oct 27
10
Nov 3
10
10These are some great observations from your field research. And you captured an interesting concern of the principal's that may help you think creatively about how to provide more opportunities to dispose of trash responsibly. (Maybe that will be a "takeaway" from your research that you can brainstorm around?) Try to take some pictures as you do your research--they will be good to include in your project portfolio and your final presentation. Keep up the good work, and try to conduct lots of observations & interviews!
Nov 9
10
10Your photos are a little fuzzy so we can't quite read all of your comments, but it sounds like you're talking mostly about the school bathrooms, but also about littering in general. That's a lot to cover in one project. Did you write a design challenge question for your project? You might want to focus on addessing unsatisfactory conditions in one specific area--either a set of bathrooms, or the school yard, or the hallways, instead of all three. It could be hard to prototype and test solutions for different kinds of problems that take place in different areas. Is one of these challenges or concerns a higher priority for your users?
Nov 17
20
20Thanks for watching this video and learning about some of the dangers of shallow research! It sounds like you know a lot about the behavior around throwing things in the trash can...can you identify some areas where you should go further in your own research to make sure you are fully exploring the problem before coming up with solution ideas? Dig deep!
Dec 8
Nov 17
10
10In doing this activity you've identified a lot of great strategies you could brainstorm around for solution ideas! Some of these are: ways to reward desired behavior, ways to create consequences for undesirable behavior, ways to make it fun to do the right thing, and physical adaptions to the current equipment and environment that might help improve conditions.
Dec 1
10
Dec 8
20
Jan 5
Dec 8
10
Dec 15
10
Dec 22
10
Jan 12
20
Jan 19
Jan 5
10
Jan 12
10
Jan 19
20
Jan 29
Jan 19
10
Jan 29
10
Jan 29
20

Badges

Start Up- Zeroll Badge

Congratulations!  You're starting to see things with a designer's eye.  Great design comes from moments of discovery such as noticing a problem or an opportunity.  Sherman Kelly did just that in 1933 when he noticed a young ice cream server who had blisters on her hands from dishing out hard ice cream.  Kelly designed a new scoop made of cast aluminum that had fluid in the handle to transfer heat from a person's hand. This feature lightly softened the ice cream, making it easier to scoop.  In addition, the scoop efficiently rolled the ice cream into balls and did not have breakable parts.  The Zeroll scoop is one of the best in the business.  You can even find one on display in New York’s Museum of Modern Art!

Empathy- Better Shelter Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes!  Designers empathize deeply to understand the people they are helping, just as Ikea and Better Shelter did when they set out to create safer and more dignified housing for refugees.  The resulting "flat pack" shelter can be assembled by 4 people in just 4 hours, is built to last three years, and features durable walls for privacy, windows for light, a locking door for security, and a solar panel that powers an overhead light and can charge a cell phone. Also, the ceiling is high enough to allow a person to stand up straight.  Over 16,000 units have been distributed, and the shelter won the Design Museum of London's Beazley Design of the Year award in 2016. 

Define - Woodland and Silver Badge:

Nice work!  Research requires patience and persistence.  Just ask Norman Woodland and Bernard Silver, who were working and studying at Drexel in 1948 when they overheard a supermarket owner ask the school president for help developing an automated system to read product information at checkout.  They settled on a design—the barcode—resembling linear Morse code and obtained a patent in 1952.  But it took much more work over many years before their vision could be fully realized, and it was in 1974 that the first product—chewing gum—was scanned at checkout.

Ideate - AP Thailand Badge:

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see everyday things or experiences with new eyes, but that's exactly what AP Thailand, a real estate company, did in a crowded neighborhood in Bangkok where there was no room to build soccer fields.  AP Thailand literally thought outside the box and designed non-traditional fields to fit into spaces that were considered unusable.  These unusual soccer fields are a hit with residents who now have a place to play their favorite sport.

Prototype - C.B.E. Badge:

Far out!  Drinking out of a cup is something we take for granted, but in space, nothing is simple.  Until recently, astronauts have had to drink from tubes inserted into special beverage pouches.  Then, some engineers came up with an idea for a specially-shaped cup that uses principles of physics to keep liquid from floating away in the zero-gravity environment of the International Space Station.  In 2015, astronauts on the ISS began using 3D printed prototypes of the cup as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment (C.B.E.).

Test - Waymo Badge:

Now you get the picture…testing is very important!  How else will you know that your idea solves your problem (and doesn’t cause unintended consequences)?  In 2009 Google began testing concepts for a self-driving car, beginning with a retrofitted Prius operating on rural roads.  As their design evolved, their testing became more sophisticated, moving onto highways and then to more complex urban environments.  The self-driving car project, which Google spun off as an independent company called Waymo, has advanced its design so far that they are now conducting a public test of self-driving cars with residents of Phoenix, AZ.

DT Philly - StoryCorps Badge:

Hooray—you are on your way to getting your story out!  You want your audience to empathize with the people you are designing for, and to understand the steps, goals, and outcomes of your design process and solution.  Take a page from StoryCorps, an organization that collects and shares stories to help people understand one another’s experiences and perspectives.  Story Corps uses audio recordings, pictures, and animations to bring stories to life.  How will you tell the story of your project?

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

Collaborator Badge