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N.O.

About Us

N.O stands for Not Official.  Our teammates are Jasmine, Justin, Malik, and Leakena.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! We're glad you're here, even if you're "not official." :) Is there anything that makes your team unique or special?
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
8You put a lot of thought into your design, and we like the way your popsocket looks like a beach ball the narhwal is playing with! Just as you paid attention to your own needs and preferences in designing your cases, you'll want to pay attention to the needs and preferences of other people--the ones you're trying to help--when you create your DT Philly design. As you can see from the two designs you submitted, different people want or need different things. Remember this as you work on your DT Philly project--the best solutions come from a deep understanding of the people you're designing for.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
8This is an interesting problem and you did a nice job writing your design challenge question. We can't wait to see what your research turns up! Are some stairwells worse than others? What kinds of trash or mess are most commonly found in the stairwell?
Oct 12
10
Nov 2
20
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
10We're curious about your observations that people could get hurt. Do you know--or might the nurse know--of anyone getting hurt in the stairwell like this? Your own comments make a strong point--no one wants to be in a dirty place or have to touch something that is messy. So what kinds of trash are you finding in the stairwell that are "distusting"? It sounds like something more than pieces of paper someone might drop. If you're not doing it already, you might want to start taking pictures to document the problem, and keeping track of how much trash appears over the course of the day, and what kind of trash it is. We didn't notice a mess in the stairwell when we visited you recently...is it more of a problem in some stairwells than others? Or do the janitors clean up the stairs at some point in the afternoon?
Nov 2
10
Nov 9
10
Dec 7
20
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
Nov 30
10
Dec 21
20
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
Dec 21
10
Jan 11
20
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
Jan 11
10
Jan 18
10
Jan 25
20
Jan 25
Jan 25
10
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!

Collaborator Badge 1 of 4