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Team Thunder

About Us

Hi, My Team name is Team Thunder. My name is Huy, i like to be active and play sport like basketball or football. My name is Ajayo and i like to draw and eat. My name is Evan and i like to read manga. My name is Daniel jones i like to eat ramen also i like to watch anime my favorite anime is Naruto and Dragon ball z also Sao. Me and My Team are ambitious and want to win the Number 1 Prize.

 

Recent comments on our work:

1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Little Einsteins
The themed trash cans are so creative! One thing that could be a issue is the trash cans being flipped over. It could create a huge mess. Besides that, wonderful idea and I wish you the best of luck (:
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Kamryn · The Dreamcatchers
I think this would be a great way for people to throw out the trash and a very fun way too. I would love to use this and I wish I could
1/11/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Joann Girnius · The Greek Gods
nice class room
1/25/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Patrick Khann · PAJAL
this is a great idea but one problem is if the trash can is not very securely attached to the desk so someone could accidentely tip the trashover and trash could go every everywhere
1/24/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Lawrence Pinkney · The Blue Bongos
What if the desk moves and tips over the trash can it will be trash all over the floor.But i do like the idea
1/11/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Joann Girnius · The Greek Gods
i love it
1/25/19 · Assignment: Lessons Learned
Patrick Khann · PAJAL
this is a great idea but one problem is if the trash can is not very securely attached to the desk so someone could accidentely tip the trashover and trash could go every everywhere
1/23/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Khyle Thompson · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Ravens
I think its a great idea because you can move trash around easier. So like people who have hurt backs this would help to take the trash out.
1/23/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Khyle Thompson · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Ravens
I think its a great idea because you can move trash around easier. So like people who have hurt backs this would help to take the trash out.
1/24/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Santana · The Ballers
I think this is a great idea because you would not have such a hard time taking the trash out but great idea

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Congratulations on solving your mystery! What was the hardest part to figure out? The strategies you used to solve this puzzle--teamwork, thinking outside the box, persistence, and seeking help if you get stuck--are strategies that will come in handy during your DT Philly project. We're excited to how you'll use your creative problem-solving skills next. P.S. We're glad your team is working well together. The collaboration box you checked is something you can use to tell us if you worked with one of our design consultants...you don't have to use it for your regular team work.
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
15Welcome to DT Philly! We hope you enjoy learning about design thinking and using it to solve a problem or make something new or better. And we look forward to meeting you when we visit for your mini design sprint!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
1These are good pictures. More important, we're sure you know how to upload and document your work on your team page. This is how you want to submit all of your assignments for DT Philly--with a nice clear picture (or a few!) and good written explanations.
Sep 28
10
8Great job with your drawing and explanation--we love the thought you put into this and the way you explained the features in your drawing. People are always trying to improve upon phone case design...what do you think of this one? https://www.techradar.com/news/this-crazy-case-design-is-like-an-airbag-for-your-smartphone. Your idea to let people personalize their case is insightful, because people have different preferences and needs. Remember this when you're working on your DT Philly project and learn as much as you can about the needs and preferences of the people you are designing for. What you learn will help you make important decisions in your design work!
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
15Thank you for including pictures of some of the problems you identified. Littering is a big problem and you will certainly make people happy by helping with this. To start with, you might want to focus on this problem in one specific place, like the lunchroom or wherever it is that you see the most trash. This will help you with your research--you only have to monitor one place--and it will help you with prototyping and testing because you can measure what changes after you try out your solution. Besides reducing the amount of trash that ends up on the ground, what is the main reason you want to do this...what is the "why" behind your project? Is it to make the janitors' day easier? Or to make the school look nicer? Or something else?
Oct 12
10
10Thanks for uploading this nice clear picture. Did Ms. Griffith show you the example of a rich picture and explain how to do it? You did a great job identifying people who are impacted by the problem, but you don't want to jump ahead to solutions just yet. This is a problem that lends itself really well to primary research. For example, you can very easily do things like tally how much trash and what kind of trash appears in a particular location every day over the course of a week. And you can map out where the trash is relative to where a trash can is. And talk to people who litter, people who don't litter, and the people who clean up the litter. Don't forget to take pictures and good notes during your research!
Nov 2
20
20Thank you for taking the time to create user profiles for your project. Is your project focused on the neighborhood or the school? And is there anyone else who might be important to consider as a user for your project? For example, students who litter? Or janitors who have to clean up? Understanding the needs of all different kinds of users will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people!
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
10It's a good observation that people are less likely to care when their surroundings are messy. Some people call this the "broken windows theory"--visible signs of bad behavior encourage more bad behavior. So, as part of your research, are you identifying where littering and trash pose the biggest problem? Wherever that is, it would be a good place to do some observation research and see how many people litter and how they do it/what is going on when they do it. And perhaps you could talk to those people to better understand why they do what they do. The janitors might be able to help you figure out where it's most important to address this problem, and they would also be good people to interview about the problem because it must have a big impact on them and how they feel about their jobs.
Nov 2
10
10It sounds like you learned some interesting things and you have a more specific focus for your project. Is there an area in the school where littering is a bigger problem or is it evenly spread throughout the school? And did you get a chance to talk to any people who litter to learn more about their behavior and motivations? If your design solution is going to focus on litterers, it might be helpful to learn as much as you can about why they do what they do.
Nov 9
10
10Thank you for completing this year's Scavenver Hunt. You got 5 of the 6 answers correct. We will share your question with Mr. Anderson and see what response he might have for you. Don't forget to check the notices section (the pink box at the top of your TEAM page, not the section of homepage that shows tweets) from time to time and read the new announcements. We left you a few questionnaires that we'd love to have you answer if you can. Just for fun we also left a riddle there for your Scavenger Hunt.
Dec 7
20
20Nice work identifying a place where you were making assumptions about what might be happening. If you don't know why trash is on the ground outside of school, you might want to go back and do some more research and observations so the solution you design can address the actual cause of the problem. Learning to reflect on and question your assumptions is a great way to strengthen any project you might do. Keep up the good work!
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
10This is a very colorful chart! And it sounds like lots of people are having to clean up after others. We didn't see where you identified any takeaways from your research--the most important needs and goals your solution should address. You'll need these before you start brainstorming. From what you wrote, it sounds like some of the needs and goals you might brainstorm around could include: 1) ways to make it super easy for people to clean up after themselves; 2) ways to get people to take pride in and care about their surroundings; and 3) ways to educate people about the negative consequences of litter. What else could you brainstorm around? Did your research tell you what kind of litter is found most often? If so, maybe you could brainstorm ways to reduce the use of that item at school.
Nov 30
10
10Way to go—you came up with so many ideas! You’ll want to prototype and test a few of these to see what kinds of things work best for your audience and location. Remember the goal of prototyping is to make something you can test to see if it has the desired effect. Is there one place at your school where littering is particularly bad? Testing your prototypes in a specific place will make it easier to observe and measure the impacts they have.
Dec 21
20
20We hope you had fun with this activity! Sometimes when you are really familiar with a problem, it can be helpful to think about it in a completely new way. Did this exercise help your team come up with any new ideas to solve your problem that you hadn't thought of before? For example, your team decided having signs that point to the trash will not have positive results, so what could you use instead to make sure people put the trash in the correct places--or are MOTIVATED to do what they should do? Making people pay a fee to use a trash cash would definitely make your problem worse. You're definitely on the right track by flipping that idea on its head. If you keep pushing a little further you may come up with some new and creative ways to solve your problem!
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10Wow, your team has so many creative solutions! Will you prototype all of them? For your solutions that are more systems based, like having a trash inspection team, you'll want to start fleshing out the details so you can create a working prototype. For example, how would volunteers sign up to be on the team? What will be the clean-up schedule? If people are making reports about litter, what do they use to do this and who receives the report? Do you need standards for how quickly a problem will be addressed? Your team has so many possible solutions to prototype and test...we can't wait to see what you do next.
Dec 21
10
10Great job on your first prototypes! We like how you utilized the materials you had available to you to create functional prototypes. For the trash can on wheels, where do you imagine having these, and how would they be used? Figuring out where they could effectively be used will help you test your idea and see if it has the expected impact. What happens if the desk trash cans get full before the end of the day? Will it be the students' responsibility to empty them? What if there's something messy or smelly in the trash can and no one wants to sit next to it? Thinking through different scenarios you might encounter will help you refine and improve your prototypes. Keep up the good work!
Jan 11
20
16Thanks for sharing your thoughts on what makes these designs special, and for considering how to apply that thinking back to your own project. Paying attention to the experience you provide to your users--making it more fun or extremely easy to do something is a good way to take your design to the next level. We can't wait to see how you make your anti-littering designs more thoughtful and engaging!
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
10Wow--your team has so many prototypes to test out! Trying different approaches is a great way to find out what which ideas have a greater impact. Have you worked out all the little details you will need to implement your testing plan? For your trash belt design, how will you decide which students will be going out to collect trash? Will the trash can in the lunchroom be on wheels as well or simply placed under the table? How will you let students know that there is somewhere to dispose of their trash under their tables? If you don't have solar panels, what will you use instead for the mobile trash can? Remember that for your presentations it's really helpful to have pictures of what you did, so consider assigning team members to different roles during testing. For example, someone can take pictures (be sure to get permission first) while others can observe and take notes on what happens. We can't wait to hear what you learn from testing!
Jan 11
10
10Your team used a smart strategy for testing by creating a control group (Mr. Galbraith's room) and an experimental group (Ms. Kiefer's room). Being able to compare a classroom using your solution and a similar classroom without the solution allows you to see how and if things change. How did you decide where to place the trash cans in the stairwells and the halls--were these areas where trash and litter collected? We can't wait to see what happens when you test out your third design! Did anything unexpected come up while you were testing? Did you talk to any students or teachers to get feedback on what they thought about the designs? How will you change your designs based on what you learned to make it even better for your next test?
Jan 18
10
10The R2-D2 trash can is so fun! We see wheels in the picture as well...do you plan on attaching it to the trash can so it can move around just like the real R2-D2? Are you planning on making any changes to your other desk trash can prototype? What are some ways you could measure the impact your designs have on the amount of littering in your school? It would be really interesting to find out how well these designs work to reduce littering and improve your school environment.
Jan 25
20
16Thank you for taking the time to go back and give feedback for another design team! You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Keep encouraging your fellow design thinkers and keep incorporating constructive feedback into your own work!
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
5Thank you for submitting your summary, implementation plan and budget! For your implementation plan, please see your DT Philly Playbook for an example...this should include dates for when you will do things. Your team has dedicated a lot of time and hard work to this project, and we appreciate your passion for your project. We can't wait to see how you share your design story with the judges and your fellow design thinkers next week.
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 2 of 4

Way to take it to the next level!  Keep the collaboration going!

Puzzle Progress 6 of 6