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NASA

About Us

Our team name is NASA. NASA means Nikyah, Anisa, Scarlet, Anayeli (our names). We are all in the 8th grade. Nikyah loves candy, Anisa is dramatic (what people say), Scarlet gets distracted a lot, and Anayeli makes edits.

Recent comments on our work:

1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Kamryn · The Dreamcatchers
I think this is a great idea and that it could help many people(except for that one problem you have). This is a really great idea.
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Kamryn · The Dreamcatchers
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Little Einsteins
I love this idea! I think a great add on to this idea would be getting some healthy snacks as well (:
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Icyss Brokenbrough · The Futures
We have been following your project. it is very close to ours. We are glad to see that another school has students who are hungry. Good luck!!!
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Michael Strachan · Ravens
Thats sounds good but have you thought of deals like 2 for 1 or other prices.
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Michael Strachan · Ravens
Thats sounds good but have you thought of deals like 2 for 1 or other prices.
1/24/19 · Assignment: Design that Delights
Jayla Stone · JJRK
this is a really great idea but would you allow students to eat in class and what if the students leave wrappers or litter in class
1/23/19 · Assignment: Design that Delights
Moira · Dynamic Dynamite Diva’s
you put kids in steed of kinds of plugs but everything was good nice paraghaps
1/23/19 · Assignment: Design Concept Sketches
Darren Chen · The Greek Gods
Smart and creative i need us one of those since i would some times be hungry in middle of class
11/8/18 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
Ashley Staford · Ravens
Good job! Keep up the good work! :)

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
15Welcome to DT Philly! We're excited to have you here and to see what you'll do with your project this year. It's great to have someone on the team who makes edits--that is a skill you'll make good use of during your project. And thank you for the fun video!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
1This is a good one! More important, we're sure you know how to upload and document your work on your team page. This is how you want to submit all of your activities for DT Philly--with nice clear pictures. And don't forget to include good written explanations.
Sep 28
10
8A bendable case sounds pretty cool! Just as you paid attention to your own needs and preferences in designing this phone case, you'll want to pay attention to the needs and preferences of other people--the ones you're trying to help--when you create your DT Philly design. As you can see from the designs submitted by teams in your class, different people want or need different things. Remember this as you work on your DT Philly project--the best solutions come from a deep understanding of the people you're designing for.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
10These sound like two important problems to address. Fighting and drama are big problems. If you choose this topic for your DT Philly project, it might make your project more manageable if you focus on a specific place or time when fighting happens. This will make it easier for you to do research (for example, to observe and see how many fights or what kinds of incidents take place over a week or two-week period of time), and it will also make it easier to develop a prototype and test it to see if it changes anything.
Oct 12
10
10You captured a lot of information here! And thank you for this nice clear picture. As you've identified, there are many factors that influence this issue, like the timing of the lunch periods and whether or not students eat breakfast. How will you go about doing your research and learning more about all of this? What kinds of questions will you ask students to learn more about their habits and experiences?
Nov 2
20
20Thank you for taking the time to create user profiles for your project. You have a good variety of users here...understanding their needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people!
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
10What time are the lunch periods at your school? Would it be helpful to survey other students to find out more about students' eating habits and when they are hungry? Is there anyone you could talk to about nutrition and about how often students should eat/what they should eat to stay energized and focused throughout the day? You're off to a good start...now it's time to get a more detailed understanding of your problem.
Nov 2
10
8The timing of the lunch periods sounds challenging, and we understand why snacks in class pose a problem as well. Do you have a nurse at your school? It might be interesting to speak with the nurse or someone else who knows about nutrition to see if there are any "best practices" or guidelines about how often or how much students should eat to keep their energy up. It might also be interesting to know if the students who have late lunch periods eat breakfast. If they don't, that might be one thing that contributes to your problem that you could consider when you're brainstorming.
Nov 9
10
10Congratulations on finding all of the answers to this year's Scavenger Hunt. We will share your question with Ms. Georgian and see what advice she might have for you. Don't forget to check the notices section (the pink box at the top of your team page) from time to time and read the new announcements. We left you a few questionnaires that we'd love to have you answer if you can.
Dec 7
20
20We're glad that you didn't find too many logical fallacies in your research. One possible fallacy you mentioned, about jumping to conclusions as to why students are hungry, is an important one to sort out because different reasons might call for different solutions. How could you learn more about that? We understand that coming up with new and fresh ideas can be really hard. Getting stuck happens to everyone, even professional designers! And realizing that you are stuck is the first step toward getting "unstuck." If you want to think about your problem in a new way, try the "Terrible Ideas" activity and see if that helps you see your problem in a new light.
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
10Did you talk to all of these people--the principal, the janitors, the cafeteria staff, teachers and students? Nice job! Any chance you spoke to the nurse as well and found out how often kids should eat? It sounds like there are a lot of challenges to be overcome here, but that just gives you lots of opportunities for creative brainstorming to figure out different ways that you can have a positive impact. We didn't see a spot on your chart where you highlighted the needs and opportunities you might want to brainstorm around. Do you have any thoughts about that? It sounds like some possible brainstorming areas might include ways to get rid of the early and late lunch periods, ways to allow students to have snacks during the school day, ways to keep things clean in classrooms. What are some other things you could brainstorm around to help make things better? Do you eat breakfast in the cafeteria or in classrooms? If it's in your classroom, how do you avoid the mess that comes with students sneaking snacks in the classroom?
Nov 30
10
10Your picture is a bit blurry so we can't read everything, but we like that you’re considering different approaches and encourage you to keep thinking creatively about this problem. Are students currently allowed to eat in class or during transitions, and do any students bring snacks to school now? If so, maybe a solution idea is to encourage students with early or late lunches to bring snacks to school. And did you look at the role breakfast plays in keeping students from getting hungry? Maybe increasing the number of students who eat breakfast could be part of a solution? These are just a few examples of different ways you could approach your problem! You might also want to consider what types of foods help people feel fuller longer, and what the health profession says about how often kids should eat—if you’re looking at offering snacks in school, this kind of information might help you make your case. No matter which ideas you decide to prototype and test, make sure you’re thinking through all of the details of your potential solutions and considering the needs of all of the people affected.
Dec 21
20
20We hope you had fun thinking up some terrible ways to solve your problem! It sounds like your team came up with some ideas that would definitely not help improve the situation, but also some that might have the kernels of good ideas in them! How can you use this kind of thinking to improve your solution ideas?
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10We appreciate all of your different ideas as well the clarity of your sketches. It sounds like some of your ideas involve making changes to current schedules and systems, and to the lunchroom...prototyping these will require a lot of attention to detail, so you might want to start making a list of questions you'll need to answer to create your prototypes. For example, how much open space is in the lunchroom and how much space do you need for each extra table? Or for vending machines--is there available space near electric outlets (vending machines need a power source)? How many tables would you need to add to eliminate an entire lunch period? Would you be able to accommodate extra students in the same amount of time? How would changing lunch affect the class schedule? Whichever ideas you decide to prototype, you'll want to start thinking about who needs to be involved to make your prototype work, what steps need to happen, and what things you'll need to create. Your goal is to make prototypes that are realistic enough for you to test them with people and see how they actually work. This will give you valuable feedback about how effective your ideas are and what can be improved. Keep up the good work!
Dec 21
10
10Thanks for sharing clear pictures of your prototypes with us! Making models is a good first step in thinking about how your ideas could work in the real world. Your next step is to make them more "real" so you can evaluate how well they would work. How many students would be added to each lunch period if you removed two periods? Is there enough seating in the cafeteria currently? If not, how many tables would you have to add, and is there enough room? Also, is there enough time to get everyone through the lunch line if there are more students at lunch? Where would the vending machine go, and what would students want to eat that the school leaders would also approve of? Would students be able to go to the vending machine whenever they want? And eat in their classrooms? As you move forward you'll want to think about how you can make these ideas more real and test how well they might work. Maybe Mrs. Griffith or another teacher, administrator, or even the cafeteria manager could help you figure out the details of moving to three lunch periods and see how well that might work. Could you actually set up the cafeteria to accommodate the extra students and see if there is room? Be sure to outline all the steps in your new lunch system! For the vending machine, how could you evaluate demand for and a good location for this? Would putting up a life-sized paper model on a wall, including food choices and prices, and hanging a log next to it asking students to record what they would buy help you learn anything? You could stop by a few times a day and collect the log to see what demand there is in the morning, in the middle of the day, and at the end of the day. Or move it to different places to see what makes sense. You could also observe if there are any unintended consequences...like traffic jams in the hallway caused by students stopping at the machine. There are lots of creative ways to test your ideas, and the more attention you pay to the details of how your ideas should work, the better your solutions will be.
Jan 11
20
16We're glad you found these designs interesting! Being thoughtful and attentive to detail can really elevate how effective, intuitive or desirable your design is, and how well it serves your users. Your team has taken into account some limitations that your user group faces -- not being able to afford snacks. Creating a program that offers students food for the small price of 25 cents is a nice way to make your solution more accessible for all students. Can you think of any other details you could address to make your design more thoughtful, useful, or enjoyable?
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
10We're glad to see you're planning how to test your prototypes. Have you thought through all the details you'll need for your other prototypes to work? For the snack time prototype, will you be providing the snacks for students, or will they bring their own? Will there be any rules about snack time? How will people know what those are? You'll want to get feedback from students and teachers to see how well it works to let students eat in class. As for your vending machine, can you think of any way you could do an initial test to see what the demand for one would be? For example, maybe you could make a giant drawing of a vending machine (including the snack options and prices you'd offer) and hang it up in the hall with a recording sheet. Students could come up and record the time they "used" the machine and what they "purchased." This could give you some sense of how much demand there is for snacks at different times of day and what prices and food options might be appropriate. You could also mock up a vending machine (use a box or a table and real snacks), and operate the vending machine manually (you give the snacks to people who buy them) to see how people respond. You could try your prototype in different places to get a better idea of where it makes sense to install a vending machine. We can't wait to see what you discover through testing!
Jan 11
10
10Nice job conducting your first test! It sounds like your team learned a lot from this experience. How did you go about selling these snacks? Did you do it in the time before class starts? If you did it during class, did you find it caused any disruptions or distractions? Were there any rules about the kinds of snack you could sell--did they have to be at least a little bit nutritious? Sometimes you learn unexpected things during testing, like the rules about when you can sell snacks. Are there any ways around this to help 6th graders? For example, if they bring a snack with them in the morning, are they allowed to eat it before lunch? Or is there someone you could speak with who could help you figure out if or how the cafeteria staff could serve more students in a lunch period? After giving 7th graders snack time, did you check in with them at the end of the day to see if it they felt more energized? And did you speak with teachers to find out if they have any concerns about students eating in the classroom? Your next step is to use what you learned to improve your designs (this is called iteration) and, if possible, test your ideas again. Keep up the good work!
Jan 18
10
10Keeping snacks affordable is a good way to be sensitive to your users' needs. It's a shame that this solution can't reach the 6th grade students because of school policy, but we encourage you to continue pursuing a change in the lunch schedule that would work for all students. Are you only offering snacks to the classes that have the earliest (and, if you can find a way around school rules) latest lunches? Are there any creative ways around this to help 6th graders? For example, if they bring a snack with them in the morning, are they allowed to eat it before lunch? If that's the case, could you could sell them a snack in the afternoon that they could bring the next morning to eat? As you think about improving your prototypes, think about all of the people who are affected by your project and how you can make a better experience for them. For example, did you survey the 7th graders who had snack to see if it they felt more energized at the end of the day? (It would be a good idea to include data in your presentation about how many students bought and ate snacks.) And did you speak with teachers to find out if they have any concerns about students eating in the classroom, or about class being disrupted by snack sales? Keep developing all the different parts of your project and looking for ways to make it an even better experience for students and staff!
Jan 25
20
20Thank you for taking the time to give some other teams encouragement and feedback. You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Asking questions is a good way to help a team see where they could explain their project better or see a detail they may have overlooked. Keep sharing your own work and supporting your fellow design thinkers on other teams!
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
5Thanks for getting us your summary, implementation plan and budget! Your next steps are to create and practice your presentation. Remember that the judges and some of your peers are not familiar with your design problem (how the school lunch schedule works, and why some students eat very early or very late), so you'll want to explain your story in a detailed and compelling way. Your team has dedicated a lot of time and effort to this, and we appreciate your passion for your project. We can't wait to see how you share your design story with the judges and your fellow design thinkers next week.
Feb 4
10
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 2 of 4

Way to take it to the next level!  Keep the collaboration going!