You are here

QuadSquad

About Us

We're the Quad Squad, and there are four of us....we are Tamara, Jayla, Khalid, and Annabelle.

Recent comments on our work:

1/25/19 · Assignment: Design Concept Sketches
Darren Chen · The Greek Gods
That would be amazing to see your designs because i don't like our school uniforms.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! We like your team name, and we're excited to see what you'll do for your project this year. Is there anything that makes your team unique or special?
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
8This is a fun design! Just as you paid attention to your own needs and preferences in designing this phone case, you'll want to pay attention to the needs and preferences of other people--the ones you're trying to help--when you create your DT Philly design. You can probably tell from the designs submitted by your classmates that there are similarities but also differences in what each team wanted or needed...so the case you designed for yourself might not be the best design for someone else. Remember this as you work on your DT Philly project--the best solution you can design will come from a deep understanding of the people you're designing for.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
8Nicely done--this is a very thoughtful question about an issue that has many sides to it. We can't wait to see what you learn during your research. There are a lot of people who will have different perspectives on this one!
Oct 12
10
6As you've pointed out, there are a lot of different perspective and issues to consider with the uniform problem. That said, you don't want to jump ahead to solutions just yet. Your next step is to conduct research to learn more about the problem. You'll do this by talking to people and observing what is going on, and maybe even collecting some data about how many students don't comply with the uniform policy. Don't forget to take pictures and good notes during your research. And don't forget to upload your rich picture and research plan to earn additional points for this activity.
Nov 2
20
20Way to go--you did a nice job with your user profiles. Understanding your users' needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people. We like the points you made about what better outcomes mean for each of these users. Keep up the good work!
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
10Nice job QuadSquad! You uncovered some really interesting things...like that uniforms are supposed to be an equalizer, but there are still signs that give away how well off a student is. Are there any consequences at your school for being out of uniform? Keep up the good work!
Nov 2
10
10It sounds like you have two different problems--that students don't like the uniforms, and that students don't always have clean uniforms (for a variety of reasons). As part of your research, did you talk to anyone who helps set school uniform policy?
Nov 9
10
8Thank you for completing this year's Scavenver Hunt. You got 5 of the 6 answers. We will share your question with one of our designers and see what response they might have for you. Don't forget to check the notices section (the pink box at the top of your TEAM page, not the section of homepage that shows tweets) from time to time and read the new announcements. We left you a few questionnaires that we'd love to have you answer if you can. Just for fun we also left a riddle there for your Scavenger Hunt.
Dec 7
20
20Nice work identifying a potential flaw in your reasoning...that more selection might not mean more students in uniform. While you have some basis to suggest that giving students more choice will make students happier and more likely to follow the rule, that doesn't address the problem of families who can't afford to buy multiple uniforms or don't always have a clean uniform. Did your research reveal which of these problems is the most common cause of students being out of uniform? Doing thorough research lays the groundwork for successful solutions, and it's never too late to add to your understanding of your problem! Perhaps looking a bit more closely at why students are out of uniform will help you create a really meaningful solution.
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
8You uncovered some interesting things, like the fact that uniform pieces are harder to find later in the year. Did you learn anything about how strictly the policy is enforced...for example, do students ALWAYS get lunch detention every time they are out of uniform? And what is considered "out of uniform?" If you have the right colors but not the exact uniform piece, do you still get detention? We didn't see where you identified any takeaways from your research--the most important needs and goals your solution should address. You'll need these before you start brainstorming. From what you wrote, it sounds like some of the needs and goals you might brainstorm around could include: 1) ways to make the uniform policy work for people of all income levels; 2) ways to make the uniforms something students want to wear; and 3) ways to help students deal with uniform "emergencies"--those times when students who have a uniform might not have a clean one to wear. What other needs or goals can you brainstorm around?
Nov 30
10
8Thank you for submitting a clear picture of your work! We like that your main ideas--a uniform bank, making compliance more flexible by expanding what's allowed, and creating a new category of Grover gear--all meet one or more of the needs you identified (helping people of all income levels, making uniforms more appealing to students, and ways to handle uniform emergencies). Brainstorming is a time to get really creative with your thinking, so feel free to keep ideating and adding to your list of potential solutions. For example, what if every student got 2 "free" days each year when they didn't have to wear one part of their uniform? Would that be a way to deal with uniform "emergencies"? (Maybe not the best way, but it's just an example to get you thinking...) Next you’ll want to prototype and test a few of these to see what ideas have the best results. Remember the goal of prototyping is to make something real enough that you can try it out to see if it has the desired effect. If you'll need the permission of school administrators to test your ideas, now is a good time to start planning how it would work so you can talk to them! And don't forget what you learned during our visit last week about thinking through the details of your prototypes.
Dec 21
20
8Thanks for your feedback on the terrible mug design. We weren't asking if any of your ideas were bad. Instead, we were asking you to try a creativity exercise and deliberately come up with ways to make your problem worse instead of better. It sounds silly, doesn't it? But sometimes approaching a problem from a completely new perspective, even a silly perspective, can help you see things differently. This is a fun activity, so don't be afraid to be silly as you think of ways to make your problem worse. Then try to flip those "terrible" ideas around and see if you end up with any new ideas to help solve your problem. Give it a try and share your thoughts to earn 8 more points on this assignment.
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10You have so many creative ideas! Which ones will you prototype and test, and will you need to work with anyone in the school to get permission to test your ideas? You'll have a lot of details to work out as you move forward with your prototypes, and paying attention to those details will help you succeed. For example, with the new Grover items, do you need to have an approved set of colors? How would people get these items? Who decides what new items are allowed? How do you keep these items affordable? Creating incentives for students to donate to the uniform bank is a great idea. Have you found a place in the school where the bank/store could be set up? This solution idea will involve a few different kinds of design--the actual store space, the systems for getting materials and for operating the store, etc. Have you thought about how you can prototype and test your ideas in a realistic way? What things will you need to make to bring your prototypes to life and evaluate how well different concepts work to improve uniform compliance and student satisfaction? We're excited to see what you do next.
Dec 21
10
10You're off to a good start with your prototyping! Your next step is to make your ideas a little bit more real so you can see how your classmates would respond to them and see if they would help improve uniform compliance and make students happier. Are these paper cutouts the colors you would like to add to the uniform policy (green, white, blue, and black)? Do any of your classmates have clothes at home you could borrow and mock up (maybe print the school name, logo, or mascot at an appropriate size and tape it on to the clothes, etc.)? One option after doing that would be to hang up the designs in the uniform bank or elsewhere and let students and staff vote for a few options of colors and styles. If you do this (or any other approach to testing your uniform design ideas), you might want to include your actual uniform options too so you can see if anyone prefers the current style. For the uniform bank, have you identified a room that could house the bank? If so, would it make sense to mock up the room as you would like it to be? Do you need a fitting room? Or displays? Is there a way to evaluate how much demand there would be for uniforms after the start of the year? Would it only be for sales, or would you also loan or rent uniform pieces to students who arrive to school out of uniform? We're not sure what happens to students who arrive out of uniform...are there any consequences? Something else you might prototype is the process by which you would collect uniforms for the bank...what steps will this system involve, and what physical things will you need (signs or flyers, announcements, collection boxes, a schedule, etc.)? Think back to your prototyping workshop and what you learned about how to design a system. Get creative in how you prototype and test so you can get some realistic feedback about what people like, what doesn't make sense, and what needs to be improved in your solution ideas!
Jan 11
20
8Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the shampoo bottle. The designers of this object were very sensitive to their users' everyday frustrations and behaviors, and they found a way for their design to help make life easier for their users. Think about the needs, behaviors, and frustrations of your user group. Can you think of some ways that you can elevate your design to make it better for your users in a special or unexpected way? Small changes can have big impacts on the effectiveness of a design. Share with us some ideas you have to take your design to the next level to earn 8 more points on this assignment.
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
10We're excited to see these prototypes in action--it sounds like you've put some good thought into this! Do you know how many people are out of uniform compliance in those two classes on a normal day? This would be helpful to know in order to see if anything changes (also, you might want to record how many students wear what color pants on your test day, and why they made that choice). Will you need to create anything in order to implement the uniform bank test? Like advertisements to remind people to bring in their donations? Or a donation drop-off box? Have you come up with any of the designs you may show to students for the Grover Gear prototypes? Having options to choose from (and pricing) will give people something specific to respond to. Remember to document your testing process with pictures and notes!
Jan 11
10
10Wow -- we are really impressed with what you were able to accomplish on your first test! A trial day for your uniform color idea was a great way to learn if that would be a desirable and feasible option to move forward. Did you talk to or survey students, staff, and maybe even parents about it to get their feedback? You have made good observations in seeing that more students wear black pants than blue. For your test, were there any rules about what type of black or blue pants students could wear? For instance, do they have to be all black? Are there restrictions on the types of fabric -- can students wear sweatpants instead of khakis? It's really exciting that Ms. Blunt is listening to the concerns you are trying to address! We're excited to see how your uniform bank idea develops. Do you have any plans to try and test it? Keep getting feedback and improving your designs, and keep up the good work!
Jan 18
10
10It sounds from these posters like students might not understand the uniform policy...and they would certainly need new reminders if the policy was changed, so it's a good idea to find ways to educate students and encourage compliance. (Are there any repercussions for showing up to school out of uniform, or are you just reminded to wear it the next day?) Where would you place posters to make sure students see them? Is there a place (physical or virtual) students go for information where you could also share the rules? Or other effective or fun ways to educate your classmates and to encourage people to follow the new policy? Did you get any feedback from students and staff after your trial day that you're now using to improve your ideas and plans?
Jan 25
20
16Thanks for taking the time to look at what some other design teams have been working on! You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Keep encouraging your fellow design thinkers and keep incorporating constructive feedback into your own work!
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 3 of 4

You’re on fire!  Great job taking advantage of your resources in the DT Philly design community.

Puzzle Progress 6 of 6