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The Greek Gods

About Us

Hi, we are The Greek Gods, team GG, containing 5 members:  Kamauri, Darren, Joann, Paul, and Isaiah.   Kamauri likes to sing and dnage during his free time.  Joanne likes to play Fortnite.  Darren likes to play video games and is good at technology and art.  Paul likes basketball, and Isaiah likes to play basketball too.

Recent comments on our work:

12/13/18 · Assignment: Design Concept Sketches
Michael Strachan · Ravens
Good job
1/11/19 · Assignment: Genius at Work
Joann Girnius · The Greek Gods
i like this good job i wish you all good luck . REALLY
12/21/18 · Assignment: Mini Design Sprint
Joann Girnius · The Greek Gods
great job so what is the problem your working on?
1/24/19 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
Scarlet Valdez-... · NASA
I like this idea! Sometimes it does get tiring sitting in an uncomfortable seat for so long.
11/7/18 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
JSantiago · Red Knights
Why did you decide to focus on furniture?
12/21/18 · Assignment: Unlock the Box
Joann Girnius · The Greek Gods
when was this?????????????????????

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Congratulations on cracking the case! Were any of the puzzles particularly challenging or fun? The persistence, teamwork, and creativity you used for this activity will help you in all parts of your DT Philly project. Thanks for the photos!
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
8Welcome to DT Philly! We like your enthusiasm and hope you enjoy learning about design thinking and the ways you can use it to solve problems or make something new or better. We look forward to seeing the great work you'll do!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
10We enjoyed reading your thoughts on the different designs from your activity cards, and we're intrigued by the "good guilty" lights on your phone case design. Would that turn your phone into a lie detector? Parents and teachers everywhere might want one!
Oct 19
20
16Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint and encourage you to use the same creativity on your DT Philly project! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Thanks for taking a walk in Jamal's shoes to understand how life is more complicated for people with dyslexia. How did it make you feel to try to read that text? It looks like you were under some pressure to read it quickly! Understanding how a problem impacts people--the frustrations they have and the things they have to do to deal with the problem--is an important part of design research. Remember this, and think about how you could empathize with the people you're designing for in DT Philly! Thanks for sending us this fun video!
Oct 5
10
10That was quite a list of potential design projects, and the one you chose sounds important since it affects all of you every day. Is your goal to make students more comfortable while they are learning in class? If so, it might be a little too early to say that you want to create furniture. You'll learn a lot during your research about the types of discomfort your fellow students feel and what contributes to that...and you may find out that good solutions could include moving around more often, or sitting properly in the furniture that you have, or other possibilities. On the other hand, if your goal is to create a piece of classroom furniture that is universally comfortable for all kinds of students, then that's a slightly different project--one that would require you to learn a lot about what "comfortable" means to all different kinds of people, and how such furniture could help you do what you need to do in the classroom. You have some time to give more thought to this, and you can revise your design challenge question as you learn more.
Oct 12
10
Nov 2
20
12Thank you for taking the time to create a user profile for your project. Understanding your users' needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people! Are you missing anyone who might be a user for your project...maybe students with different body types who have different complaints? Or teachers who might have thoughts or preferences about the kind of furniture they want in their classroom? Or the janitors who have to be able to move and clean around the furniture? To earn more points, create a few more profiles that represent people you've spoken to or learned about who are affected by this problem.
Oct 19
Oct 19
Nice work! Did you notice the change before they showed you what was going on in the video? It's sometimes easy to miss things that are right in front of you. Remember this when you're doing your research, and keep your eyes open to everything that is going on. Good designers notice things that no one else does!
Oct 19
10
10Why is school seating the way it is? If you think about it, lots of seating in public places is kind of uncomfortable...bus seats, benches, seats at sporting events. Can you think of some practical reasons why these seats tend to be hard or have other characteristics which make them uncomfortable? It might be interesting to catalog what students' main complaints are because they could have different causes and different solutions. For example, if it's that the edges of the desks are rough, is that a repair issue?
Nov 2
10
It looks like you wanted to submit something, but nothing was uploaded or entered. Would you like to try again?
Nov 9
10
10Thank you for completing this year's online scavenger hunt. You got 3.5 out of 6 answers correct. We want to make sure you know how to access all of the resources available, so we have a few questions for you...do you know where to find our comments back to you on each of your assignments? Are you watching our video introductions to each stage of the design process? And have you read any of our annoucments in the Notices section of your team page? Let us know if you need help finding any of these...and keep an eye out for notices and new feedback throughout your DT Philly project!
Dec 7
20
20Making sure your solution works in the space you have is definitely an important concern, and we're glad you identified it in this activity. Are there any other places where you could have gone a bit further in your research, where you may have missed something important, or where you're relying on assumptions and generalizations? For example, do all students have the same opinion about what makes a chair comfortable or uncomfortable? Are there any other things about the classroom environment that you have to consider in designing a good solution?
Nov 16
Nov 16
It looks like you wanted to submit something but maybe forgot to attach the file. Would you like to try again? We'd love to see what you did!
Nov 16
10
Nov 30
10
10Thank you for sharing your brainstorming ideas with us. We like that you're thinking about two different approaches...adapting your existing furniture, and alternatives to the existing furniture. Did your research give you a specific understanding of what's uncomfortable for students...is it the seat, or the back? As you get into prototyping, you'll want to start thinking about your ideas in more detail...for example, what qualities or features would a cushion need to stand up to the rigors of daily use in school? What things would you have to consider if you wanted to use alternate types of seating in the classroom?
Dec 21
20
20Thanks for sharing your reactions to these terrible designs! Thinking in unusual and creative ways can sometimes open your eyes to great solutions you would not otherwise have thought up! Having broken legs and spikes on the chairs would definitely make them much more uncomfortable. Did this type of thinking lead you to any new ideas you can apply to your design solutions? Are there repair problems with the chairs where fixing what's broken could improve students' experiences? Or maybe there are problems matching students to the right size chair for them? Maybe it's not just the texture of the seat but also the fact that students spend so much time sitting that contributes to discomfort?
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10Thank you for sharing your chair sketches! A good way to communicate all of the details behind your designs is to make notes on your sketches that point out and explain key features of your design. Do your sketches show two different designs, or are they different students' view of the same idea? We hope you'll prototype a few different solution ideas to see what works best to make students more comfortable while learning in the classroom. As you develop your prototype ideas, think about how you can make your ideas "real" enough that you can actually test them with people and get feedback.
Dec 21
10
10It looks like you're missing some pictures showing the bean bag seating and lounge chair. We'd love to see all of your prototypes, so please try uploading those pictures. For your chair that has more leg room and cushioning, can you adapt an existing classroom chair to have these features so you can test it out with students and see how they respond? Rapid prototypes don't have to be pretty, but they should help you work out details about your ideas and build up to a prototype that you can actually test with your users. We can't wait to see what you do next.
Jan 11
20
20We always love to hear your thoughts about designs we share with you! Your team has done a good job thinking about ways that you can make your seating designs more delightful and easy to use. Do you think you'll incorporate any of these ideas into the next prototype of your design? Try to think deeply about who your user will be and what their needs are. This information will inform the choices you make about additions or changes to the design. It will be interesting to see if the new design works better for people when you test them a second time.
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
8We're excited to hear about the reactions you get with your comfortable seating designs! Did you make life-sized prototypes to use? How will you collect feedback from people who try out your designs? Be sure to observe their behavior as well as ask them (in person or through something like a survey) for their reactions. Sometimes you can learn as much from the way a person acts as you can from what they say. Look for reactions that tell you what works about your designs but also what missed the mark or causes unanticipated problems or needs to be improved. People's feelings about what is comfortable can be very different, so you might have to test with a lot of different people to get a good variety of feedback. Be sure to document this process with detailed notes and photos/videos. Having this information to review will be helpful as you iterate and continue to improve your designs based on what you learn from testing.
Jan 11
10
6Thank you for sharing images of your testing process! We want to know a bit more about what you learned through testing. It's great to use things you already have to help create prototypes, but these seats are already in your classroom and used by students, and it doesn't appear that you made any design changes to them, so we're not sure what you're prototyping and testing. Are we remembering correctly that seat cushions and arm rests were concepts you wanted to test? Can you modify a few desks in your classroom to try to make them more comfortable and have classmates test them out? Students might have different opinions about what's comfortable based on personal preference or on their physical measurements (size, height, etc.), but testing will help you understand what works best for the most people. Remember that when you're testing, you want to get as much feedback from as many people as possible, and you want to be open to feedback that challenges your ideas as well as feedback that validates your ideas. Tell us more about your prototypes, how you tested them, and what you learned to earn 4 more points for this assignment.
Jan 18
10
10Your test results are very interesting! Can you think of some ways that you can maintain seating comfort without tempting students to take a nap? Pairing up with another team is an interesting idea, but you may also want to think about design choices your team can make to eliminate this unanticipated problem (rather than trying to balance it out with a solution to a different problem). It's great that you had positive results in terms of comfort and keeping the classroom calm. Could you get more specific feedback to understand how the Adirondack chairs contribute to kids falling asleep? Do you think the shape of the chair, which reclines back, might be contribute to the problem? How does providing a foot rest affect the position? Adirondack chairs are typically meant for relaxing...could the shape of the chair promote that feeling? "Task" chairs (chairs used for doing work) typically encourage a more upright position. Can you think of any reason why that might be a design decision for task chairs? Identifying what is relaxing students to the point they fall asleep is the first step toward improving your design to eliminate that problem.
Jan 25
20
20We hope you had a good time looking at some of the projects other teams have been working on! Your team has done a nice job supporting other teams and giving them shoutouts. You've also asked a good question that will help the team develop a more thorough explanation of their design for their presentation. You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Keep sharing your own work and supporting your fellow design thinkers on other teams!
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
10Thank you for sharing your summary, implementation plan and budget! Your team has dedicated a lot of time and work to this project over the past months -- keep up the good work. We can't wait to see how you share your design story with the judges and your fellow design thinkers next week at the Showcase.
Feb 4
10
6
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 1 of 4

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!

Puzzle Progress 4 of 6