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The Ballers

About Us

Hi we are The Ballers from Shawmont School. Kevin likes to play games and type a lot. My name is Joey and I love to play ¨The division.¨ I'ḿ Santana and I like to play basketball and play video games. My name is Jerry and I like to watch videos. Hi, I'm Kylee and I'm the only girl in the group and I like Netflix.

Recent comments on our work:

1/24/19 · Assignment: Genius at Work
Viet-My Le-Nguyen · Delavietie
I love your idea to help kids sleeping in class because its a major problem I often see in school. What are you planning to put in the healthy shakes to keep the kids awake? If its sugar, would that make the kids really hype?
1/24/19 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
Scarlet Valdez-... · NASA
I agree. Some students come to school tired from not getting enough sleep.
11/9/18 · Assignment: Our Design Challenge
Saviyon Evans · The Golden Tigers, Team Tigers, Team Tigers
That is a really a good idea and some of us can relate to that because we can relate to that. Team Tigers
10/11/18 · Assignment: In Their Shoes
James Blue · Team Tigers
Thank you for sharing the pictures and feedback. We agree! We learned a lot too.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Congratulations on solving the mystery! It sounds like everyone contributed to your success in different ways. Teamwork, creativity, persistence, and knowing when to ask for help will help you in your DT Philly project and in many other things you'll do throughout your lives.
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! It sounds like your team really enjoys technology, which means you've probably seen a lot of systems and experience design. (You'll learn more about these when you watch The Wonderful World of Design video.) Thanks for coming back to upload a logo!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
It looks like you tried to turn in something for this assignment, but there were no pictures or text. If you're having trouble submitting your work, ask Ms. Banaszak or one of your classmates to show you how to upload and then submit material.
Oct 19
20
16Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint and encourage you to use the same creativity in your DT Philly project! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Thanks for the pictures and for empathizing with Jamal to understand how life is more complicated for people with dyslexia. Understanding how a problem impacts people--the frustrations they have and the things they have to do to deal with the problem--is an important part of design research. How will you empathize with the people you're designing for in DT Philly?
Oct 5
10
10Nice work on your design challenge question! You picked an important problem, and you did a good job describing the problem and the goal without jumping ahead to a solution. Do you see a lot of cranky outburst in school, and are students late because of sleeping in?
Oct 12
10
10You identified some important components of your problem in your rich picture. Nice work. There are so many interesting things you could learn in your research about students' sleep habits, evening routines, how they feel during the school day, etc.--we can't wait to see what you discover next.
Nov 2
20
12Thank you for taking the time to create a user profile for your project. Understanding your users' needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people! Are you missing anyone who might be a user for your project? The persona you created seems to represent students who stay up too late because of homework. Would another group of users maybe be students who stay up to late watching tv, playing games, or being on social media? Or maybe parents who need to get their children to go to sleep earlier? Or maybe there are other groups that would be important to think about? To earn more points, create a few more profiles that represent people you've spoken to or learned about who are affected by this problem.
Oct 19
Oct 19
Nice work! Did you notice these things before they showed you how it was done? It's sometimes easy to miss things that are right in front of you. Remember this when you're doing your research, and keep your eyes open to everything that is going on. Good designers notice things that no one else does!
Oct 19
10
10Lack of sleep is certainly a problem, and for many of us it has to do with poor time management or bad habits. Would it be helpful to survey the students in your grade about their sleep habits...what time they go to bed and get up, what they do in the hours before going to bed, how tired they feel at different points in the day, etc.? Or maybe ask your class to keep sleep journals for a week, documenting their sleep habits and what they do in the evening? Do any of the parents try to do anything about it? It's kind of funny when you think about it...if we know we'll feel better by getting the correct amount of sleep, why don't we try harder to do it?
Nov 2
10
This looks like your research plan, not your research findings. (And a user persona for the Fresh Perspectives activity--we will upload a copy of that in the right place for you.) See your playbook for instructions about how to do this activity, and submit the requested information to earn points.
Nov 9
10
10Thank you for completing this year's online scavenger hunt. You got 4 of the 6 answers correct. We want to make sure you know how to access all of the resources available, so we have a few questions for you...Are you watching the video introductions to each stage of the design process--the ones that show how a student design team approached a problem in their school? You can find the links to these videos in the activity list on your team page. Do you have a copy of the DT Philly Playbook, and does Ms. Banaszak go over the material in that with you so you know how to do different parts of your project? We will forward your question to Jackie and see if she can give you some advice. Let us know if you need help with anything...and keep an eye out for notices and new feedback throughout your DT Philly project!
Dec 7
20
20Good job reflecting on your work! It sounds like your team understands the importance of thinking deeply and questioning your assumptions before deciding on a course of action. This is a strategy you can use to strengthen any project you work on. We encourage you to explore the idea you have but also to explore the problem a bit more and see if you're missing anything important. Doing thorough research lays the groundwork for successful solutions. Do you think you considered enough ideas for addressing the root cause of the problem by helping students get more sleep? Are there ways to encourage this besides allowing naps in special beds at school? And do you think you spent enough time exploring ways to keep students awake and alert in class?
Nov 16
Nov 16
Thank you for sharing these creative drawings! You seem to be following a theme of food images--isn't it interesting how one idea can inspire another? . A teacher from another team noticed that his students drew different things depending on which way they held the paper--for example, a triangle for some became an ice cream cone, but for students holding the paper a different way it became a hat. This is a great insight...sometimes looking at a situation from a different angle can help you see new things!
Nov 16
10
10It sounds like there are a lot of reasons why students don't get enough sleep...some of them are in the students' control, and some are outside their control. Did your research tell you if students understand the importance of sleep, or help you understand their attitudes toward sleep? Or did you talk to any students who go to sleep in time to be well rested for school the next day? If you find students who fit this profile, you may be able to learn more about what keeps them on a good sleep schedule, and this may inspire your own thinking about solutions. If students know better and still don't go to bed on time, that might give you a theme to brainstorm around--what are all the ways you can think of to help students do what they know they need to do, or all the ways you can think of to disrupt the lure of social media and technology?
Nov 30
10
10Thank you for sharing your brainstorming process with us. Based on your takeaways, it sounds like your solution ideas should achieve one of two goals...get students to sleep more, and keep students awake in class. We're a little confused about some of your brainstorming ideas...they sound like reasons why students don't sleep at night, rather than ways to help students sleep at night. Or are you saying that noise and movement are two ways to keep students awake in class? You'll want to prototype and test a few different ideas to see what works best, so we encourage you to explore and brainstorm a bit more before you begin prototyping. What are all of the ways you could help students get more sleep? And all of the ways you could keep students awake and alert in class?
Dec 21
20
20Letting students go home with no consequences to sleep during the day would definitely make your problem worse! Did thinking about your problem from a different perspective give you any new insights into potential solutions? For example, what if students slept more before they left home in the morning instead of going home during the day?
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10You've sketched out some ambitious prototypes! We love the name of your health shake. How will you prototype and test it (and do you need permission from anyone to do this)? There are a lot of details to think about here...what goes into the shakes? Who makes them? When and where can students get them? What will they cost? Will students who need them buy them? How will you evaluate whether or not they solve your problem? It's never too early to start thinking through details like these that will help your solutions succeed. You'll need the same attention to detail in prototyping and testing the nap chair. We like that you're already thinking about the space considerations and not disrupting class. How can you prototype and test this idea? Will it be up to teachers to decide who is allowed to take a nap and when? Are there extra adults in classroom who can monitor naps and wake students up on time? What happens if a student has trouble waking up or won't get up? How will you evaluate whether this makes students more attentive in class? We're excited to see what you learn by prototyping and testing your ideas. Remember that you'll want to make your prototypes as realistic as possible so when you test them you can evaluate how well they work to solve your problem and what improvements you can make.
Dec 21
10
8Thanks for taking the time to make models of your ideas! We like how you provided the context of the classroom for your bean bag prototype, but what are some ways you could make an actual bean bag that people can use. How will the design of your bean bag be different? For the Stay Awake Shake, think about what the system is for getting students who need to be energized your product. How will you determine who needs the shakes? Anyone who wants one? How will you deliver the shakes to the correct students?
Jan 11
20
12Your team made in-depth observations about these designs -- way to go! We can really tell that you thought about the characteristics that make them so desirable and useful. You've done a good job explaining what about your solution is already thoughtful and convenient. Now can you draw some inspiration from the cards we gave you and find new ways to make your design special? Being thoughtful and attentive to small details can help you see ways to make your design more useful, convenient, effective, or pleasing. Tell us what you come up with to receive 8 more points on this assignment.
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
8We're excited to see how your two prototypes look in action! How did you come up with the recipe for the Stay Awake Shake? Why does it help students stay awake? Does your team have the ability to follow the students who try the shakes throughout the entire day in order to see the impacts? You'll want to take lots of notes during testing and get feedback from the people who use your designs so you can determine what works well, and what could be improved. For your in-class nap idea, who will be keep track of how long a student naps and then wake them up? Can any student take a nap whenever they want? And have you thought about a way to ensure that the students still learn the information that was taught while they were asleep? Try to be really alert to what is happening when you test your ideas--you want to understand the feedback that supports your ideas but also any feedback that challenges your assumptions or solution ideas. Also remember to get feedback from ALL of the people who make up the audience for your project. That could include the students themselves, the people who are responsible for implementing the ideas, and maybe even the teachers or other school personnel who want their students to stay alert and engaged. Keep up the good work.
Jan 11
10
10Congratulations on testing your first prototypes! We're excited that you had a positive experience. How did you decide what ingredients to put in the Stay Awake Shake, and did you follow up with students who drank the shake later in the day to see if they were still energized? Did you also get feedback from teachers about how students behaved for the rest of the day? Do you think any unintended consequences might arise from giving shakes and naps to some students but not to all students? Addressing the root cause of the problem--not getting enough sleep at night--also seems like a good idea. Your next step is to use what you learned to improve your designs, figure out how to overcome any barriers to implementing your design more broadly (details like who would buy or make the shakes each day, how do you decide who gets them, etc.), and--if you have time--test your improved designs again. Keep up the good work!
Jan 18
10
10Thank you for these thoughtful explanations about what happened with your prototypes. Can you tell us how you came up with the recipe for the Stay Awake Shake? Explaining the research that went into your design--the reasoning behind the ingredients you chose--is an important part of your design story. Have you followed kids who drank it throughout the day to see if its effects are long lasting? How long does it take for students to perk up after drinking it? Improving the taste and the branding sound like good next steps. And have you thought about how you will continue to decide who gets to have a shake? Do teachers give them to students who they think need it, or do students request it themselves? And are the shakes free, or does the student or teacher have to pay for them?
Jan 25
20
20Thank you for taking the time to give some other teams encouragement and feedback. You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Asking questions is a good way to help a team see where they could explain their project better or see a detail they may have overlooked. Keep sharing your own work and supporting your fellow design thinkers on other teams!
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
10Thank you for submitting your summary and implementation plan. We appreciate all you've done for this project in the past few months -- keep it up! Your next steps are to get your presentation and display board ready, and to practice your presentation so you can really "wow" the judges on the 6th!
Feb 4
10
Feb 4
20

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 1 of 4

Nice work getting the conversation started!  Collaboration is key to the design process!

Puzzle Progress 4 of 6