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Team Tigers

About Us

We are “Team Tigers” and we are here to create and design! Our team members are: Jumpstart James, Creative Khalil, Maker Mike, Awesome Amir, Marvelous Mike, Saavy Saviyon, Super-Size Steven, and Clever Khyree. We love the challenges and activities we get in the Design Thinking competition every year! As Team Tigers, we also love the mission of defining problems and designing solutions. Our motto is: It Takes Teamwork To Make The Dream Work!!!

Recent comments on our work:

Saviyon Evans · The Golden Tigers, Team Tigers, Team Tigers
9/25/18 · Assignment: Meet the Team
Ajayo Willock · Team Thunder
nani

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Congratulations on cracking the case! We're glad you enjoyed this activity, and we hope you use the persistence, teamwork, and creativity you showed here throughout your DT Philly project. Thanks for the photos!
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
15Welcome to DT Philly! We're excited to see that you have returning team members and new team members, and we love your nicknames. All of those skills and characteristics represented by your nicknames will serve you well in DT Philly and in life. We can't wait to see the great work you'll do this year. And thank you for including a video for your bonus activity!
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
1No one from Tilden was at Drexel to do this activity with us, but we admire your initiative in doing it anyway. You must have a lot of fun stuff in your classroom if you have googly eyes at the ready! Thanks for practicing your creativity and making us smile with these fun pictures.
Sep 28
10
10Way to go--you did such a great job on this! We love the thought you put into your answers and the Venn diagrams Mrs. Padgett made for you--we might have to borrow that idea! Did you notice how your team members focused on some different features in your phone case designs? As you can see, people aren't all the same--they have different preferences and needs. This is why you want to learn a lot about the people you are designing for once you choose a topic for your DT Philly project--understanding their needs will help you make important decisions in your design work. When we were thinking of phone case designs, we came across this crazy case...it doesn't have a lot of features, but it is a bit different. What do you think? https://www.techradar.com/news/this-crazy-case-design-is-like-an-airbag-for-your-smartphone.
Oct 19
20
20Thanks for having us out to do this activity with you. We had fun, and we enjoyed your creative ideas about how to solve this problem!
Oct 5
Oct 5
Thanks for taking a walk in Jamal's shoes to understand how life is more complicated for people with dyslexia. We're excited that you took this even further and learned more about the problem and people who are affected by it. Can you imagine feeling like this whenever you have to read something? Understanding how a problem impacts people--the frustrations they have and the things they have to do to deal with the problem--is an important part of design research. Remember this, and think about how you could empathize with the people you're designing for in your DT Philly project. Thanks for sharing this fun video!
Oct 5
10
15You came up with so many great problems (we've never heard anyone say that students need more interesting homework, but that definitely makes sense!), and you chose an important one. It's hard to keep things going with the same level of commitment and enthusiasm that went into launching something new. It sounds like that may have happened with the garden, and bringing it back to it's original beauty and vitality sounds like a worthy goal.
Oct 12
10
10Excellent job on your this, and kudos to you for trying a new technology to do it! You painted a great picture of what's going on with the garden and what different people's concerns are. You also have some good ideas about how to learn more. How will you assess the greater community's interest in the garden? It sounds like they are an important piece of what you're working on. Keep up the good work!
Nov 2
20
20We're impressed with the number of personas you created and the detail you put into them--you captured a lot of different perspective here! As you get into brainstorming and protoyping later in your project, check back to see if the solutions your'e working on address the needs and goals of these users. Keep up the great work!
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Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Way to take it to the next level!  Keep the collaboration going!

Collaborator Badge 2 of 4