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The Futures

About Us

Hi there. We are ... The Futures. We are a team of 8th Graders at William C. Longstreth School: Tatiana, Fahtama, Fahim, Phil, Khalil, Icyss, Shanice and Aniyah. Many of us have been at our school since kindergarten and want a chance to help before we leave for 9th grade. We hope to find a solution to a problem to help as many people as possible. We are ... The Futures

Recent comments on our work:

1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Little Einsteins
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Kamryn · The Dreamcatchers
This prototype(in my opinion) is really good and a smart idea for certain people who don't have enough time to eat before they leave their house but some people still might not be able to buy things
1/23/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Micheal Clement · The Golden Tigers, Team Tigers, Team Tigers
I like this. i like when we get or need snacks, we don't have to pay for it. its like a free snack delivery. thumbs up!
1/25/19 · Assignment: Take 2: Prototype Iteration
Cierra Lyles · Shawmont Roaring Lions, Team ABC, Little Einsteins
I like where your team is going with this. With you making sure people are able to get food at school and not having to pay for it, But if I were in your team Id recommend giving food to the homeless once a week every week. Good job though (:
1/24/19 · Assignment: Design that Delights
Scarlet Valdez-... · NASA
I think that this is really cool! It's a nice way to go around the school.
1/22/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Steven Thomas · Team Tigers
This is such a great idea. We would love to see this at our school. We like snacks and sometimes our teacher doesn't have them for us. We can't go to the store. Your prototype will help a lot of kids. Our question is: Have you checked with other teachers yet to see if they will allow deliveries to their classrooms? We really like how you are using Google forms in your prototype. We are using Google to in or prototype. Excellent job!
1/23/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Darren Chen · The Greek Gods
Sounds like a great idea having a post delivered in school to the teams but who is gonna deliver it?
1/30/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Gina Griffith · The Black Power Puff Girls, Out Smarters, 7A+, Cookies and Creme, The Fabulous 5, TropicalZZZ, Monstars, N.O., Delavietie, Triple Threat, Team Thunder, NASA, QuadSquad
One of our school teams ran into lots of problems trying to sell snacks, so many rules. No nuts, or peanut butter, we heard our teacher tell them what the principal said. Also the could not sell any snacks b4 lunch. Your snacks look good. What is the price?
1/25/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Cade · The Dreamcatchers
My team thinks that you guy's food cart is a good idea for the kids who are hungry so that they can eat but also the food could cause mice and crumbs .
1/25/19 · Assignment: Rapid Prototypes
Tamika · Dynamic Dynamite Diva’s
I really like the idea! It's super creative and I think it would be a good way to hand out food to students. But maybe instead of having one person walk around the school and do it, you can have more people in different parts of the school so it could less exhausting.

Our Progress

Due Assignment Max Points Our Points
Sep 21
Sep 21
Sep 21
10
10Welcome to DT Philly! We're delighted you've decided to join us, and we hope you enjoy learning about design thinking and using it to solve a problem or make something new or better. Your commitment to leaving a legacy at your school is inspiring, and we can't wait to see the great work you will do this year.
Sep 21
Sep 24
1
Sep 28
10
10It sounds like you had some very creative phone case designs! People are always trying to improve upon phone case design...what do you think of this one: https://www.techradar.com/news/this-crazy-case-design-is-like-an-airbag-for-your-smartphone. No french fry holder, but it is a bit different! It's interesting that you found a lot of different features that were important to each of you. As you can see, people aren't all the same--they have different preferences and needs. This is why you will want to learn a lot about the people you are designing for once you choose a topic for your DT Philly project--understanding their needs will help you make important decisions in your design work.
Oct 19
20
20Thank you for having us out to visit. We had fun working with you on your mini design sprint! Remember the tips we gave you about how to do each stage of your design thinking project, and let us know if you have questions or need help at any point in your project.
Oct 5
Oct 5
Oct 5
10
15Wow, there are so many things you can learn about with a project like this! From calorie and nutritional needs, to rules governing what you can do, to students habits and preferences (which influence their behavior)...you have your work cut out for you, and we can't wait to see what you learn from your research. We do have one question...are you focusing on school breakfast? Your goal of helping students get to school on time seems to suggest that morning food is a priority. Thanks for including photos.
Oct 12
10
10It's great that you already started on your research with your survey. We know there are a lot of rules about food in schools. Why is that? Is it important ot understand why those rules are in place and what the goals are? Or why students don't have breakfast in the morning either at home or at school (we're guessing your school serves breakfast)? You're right...there's a lot to learn about this topic, and we're excited to see what you discover throughout your research.
Nov 2
20
20Thank you for taking the time to create a few user profiles for your project. It sounds like the teachers you identified as users really aren't affected by the problem. Do you think you only have one type of user among all of the students in your school? From the surveys you did a little while back, it sounds like there are different groups of users just within the student body. And do you think you might be missing any other users? Maybe people who are have some say in when/where/what students can eat in school? Understanding your users' needs and the challenges they face will help you come up with creative solution ideas that work for many people!
Oct 19
Oct 19
Oct 19
10
10Way to go! We can tell you've been working hard. Your survey is very interesting, and the couple of responses you included seem to indicate that not everyone has the same opinon about being able to snack during class time, or even about buying snacks. It's interesting, too, that there isn't enough breakfast to go around. Are students more likely to eat the breakfast food than the lunch food? We also wonder if the students who don't buy snacks or don't eat snacks during the school day report lower energy levels than the students who go to the poppy store? Is it possible that what students eat (not just whether they snack) has an impact on energy levels--are some foods better for sustaining focus and energy?
Nov 2
10
10Nice work going back out there and collecting more information! Did anyone from the cafeteria talk to you about school district guidelines that might be relevant to your project?
Nov 9
10
10Congratulations on finding all of the answers to this year's Scavenger Hunt! We will share your question with Ms. Frost and see what advice she might have for you. Don't forget to check the notices section (the pink box at the top of your team page) from time to time and read the new announcements. We left you a few questionnaires that we'd love to have you answer if you can.
Dec 7
20
20It looks like you may have forgotten to upload your images. Could you try attaching them again? We always love to see pictures from your team! You did a good job reflecting on some things that could go wrong with your solution ideas. It's smart to revisit your solution ideas and try to anticipate problems, but it might be even more important to revisit your research and make sure you learned enough about the problem to develop an effective solution. For example, did you talk to administrators or cafeteria staff as part of your research to learn what constraints (rules or limitations) your solution might have to work within? What research leads you to believe that offering food will reduce tardiness--did providing school breakfast have that kind of effect? Doing thorough research lays the groundwork for successful solutions. Is there any place where you are relying on assumptions or generalizations, areas that you didn't explore, user groups that you didn't speak to, or important questions that you didn't yet answer? It's never too late to add to your understanding of your problem and make your ideas even better!
Nov 16
Nov 16
Nov 16
10
10Those are some interesting pictures! Another team also submitted some information about school milk being out of date. There have been some news stories in recent years about what the "use by" and "best by" dates actually mean. You should look them up and see what they say. And maybe see if the school district has a policy about those. Your design challenge focused on lateness in the morning due to students stopping to pick up food, but what you're talking about here seems to focus more on lunch than morning hunger. Have you switched your focus? And would it make sense to find out anything about students' calorie and nutritional needs? It's a good idea to brainstorm ways to keep your solution affordable and accessible. Remember to keep your solution options open at this point and consider a wide variety of ways to do that. For example, would finding ways to allow students to bring their own food to school, or ways to get students to eat breakfast before coming to school, or ways to partner with school to make changes that would increase participation in school breakfast and lunch all be approaches you could use to address your problem in affordable and accesible ways?
Nov 30
10
10We like the way you broke your problem down and we appreciate your creative thinking! Is the goal of your project to allow students to eat what they want to and when they want to, or to sustain students' energy and focus throughout the day? If it's the latter--and if getting students to school on time is still part of your project--are you missing an opportunity by not doing some brainstorming around breakfast options and participation? What are all the ways you can think up to help students show up to school on time and eat something nutritious and sustaining in the morning?
Dec 21
20
20We're glad you enjoyed this activity! The ideas you came up with are pretty terrible. :) Now can you flip this thinking around and find some new ways to achieve your goals (and has the focus of your project now changed to providing alternatives to school lunch...and if that's the case, how important is it to provide nutritional food)?
Dec 7
Dec 7
Dec 14
10
10You can do almost anything--drawing included--if you're willing to give it your best shot. We like the variety of ideas you sketched, and we're excited that you'll get to try out different types of design (systems, products, spaces, experiences--remember the Wonderful World of Design video?) as you work on your prototypes. You have some ambitious ideas here, so you'll want to be very detail oriented as you work on your prototypes. For example, who will supervise and operate the Early Bird Cafe? (We like the name and the thought you already put into this idea.) Are there any rules about who can come, and do students who come in early have to stay in the cafe until the school day starts? Is there a limit to how many students could be there and, if so, what happens if more students show up? Who is responsible for handling the money, and what can it be used for? These are just a few of the details you'll want to think about as you prototype and test. The snack delivery system will require just as much attention to detail as you think through ordering and payment systems, who will manage this and when it will happen, how much time you need to process and fill orders, who will manage the money and what it can be spent on, etc. Try to make your prototypes as realistic as possible so you can evaluate what works best to solve your problem (how will you evaluate that?). We can't wait to see what you do next!
Dec 21
10
10Wow--your team has done a great job bringing your ideas to life through prototyping! We're excited to see what you learn though testing. Did you get input from students and administration about what snacks would be desirable and appropriate? Will anything need to be refrigerated? Do you have to limit ordering and distribution times to manage disruptions to learning for both students who are getting food and those who are running the system? Who is in charge of managing the money and keeping food in stock? We'll also be curious to learn how teachers and janitors respond to students eating in class. So many things to learn! And, finally, how will you evaluate the impact of making snacks available before lunch? We look forward to hearing more as you improve and advance your different ideas.
Jan 11
20
20Thank you for sharing ideas to elevate your design! These ideas sound like they'd make your system easier to operate, which could make your initiative easier to sustain. Is there a way to make these ideas real? And, just as important, is there anything you can think of that would make your system better for your users? Maybe simple changes that not only address the concerns you identified but delight the students and teachers?
Jan 4
Jan 4
Jan 4
10
10We're so glad you found the planning worksheet helpful. Your team has demonstrated that you are good at paying attention to detail, so stay alert to everything that is going on while you test and try to capture as much feedback as possible--the feedback that supports your ideas, but also the feedback you can use to challenge your assumptions or improve your ideas. This would also be a good time to revisit the "why" of your original design challenge question, and gather the information or feedback that lets you know how effectively you are solving the problem you identified. It's not uncommon for teams to implement ideas that are interesting but don't necessarily solve the problem they set out to address. Also remember to get feedback from ALL of the people who make up the audience for your project. Is that just students, or does that include staff and teachers as well? We can't wait to see your ideas in action!
Jan 11
10
10Nice job! It sounds like you learned a lot of important things by testing your designs. Your next step is to use what you learned through feedback and observations to improve your designs and address any barriers to your success (it sounds like finding a way to deal with trash and mess caused by snacking in class might be an important addition to your project, unless you just want to sell snacks to be eaten during lunch periods). If you can, try to test your designs after you refine them to see if you achieved the desired outcomes. Now might also be a good time to think about how you could sustain this system. Is there anything you're doing in the short term that might be hard to keep up for the rest of the year (for example, are you missing class time every day to operate the snack system and is it realistic for that to continue, do you have a sustainable system in place for getting snacks, etc.) Keep up the good work. We can't wait to see your next steps.
Jan 18
10
10Way to go--your team has done a good job addressing the concerns you learned about during testing. Offering a cleaning service for teachers who allow students to eat during class was a very creative idea. Do you foresee any problems with that? For example, would they need clean ups during times when you're in class? Where will you get cleaning supplies, and how quickly can you respond to requests? Are there other possible ways you could address this particular challenge to keep teachers (and students who like clean classrooms) happy? We also think the idea of having a frequent buyer card is a fun way to encourage students to come to school on time. There might be other ways to do that too... Feel free to keep developing and testing your ideas in the weeks leading up to the Showcase!
Jan 25
20
20Thanks for giving some shoutouts to other design teams! You can learn a lot from seeing how other people approach problems and work through them, just as you can learn a lot from seeing how people outside your team understand your work. For this reason, knowing how to give feedback and receive feedback are important skills to develop. Did your team learn anything new by looking at how other people approached their design problems?
Jan 25
Jan 28
10
10Thank you for submitting your summary, implementation plan and budget. Your team has dedicated a lot of time and hard work to this project, and we appreciate your passion for your project. We can't wait to see how you share your design story with the judges and your fellow design thinkers next week1
Feb 4
10
10
Feb 4
20
20Great job preparing for your presentation and learning from your practice session. The more you practice, the more comfortable you will feel at the Showcase. We can't wait to see you on February 6!

Badges

Start-Up: Nike Grind Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer!  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, like Nike did when they began recycling worn-out shoes to reduce the company's environmental impact.  The recycled shoes were ground up and used to create springy surfaces for athletic facilities.  For example, Sacramento Kings fans donated their sneakers to be used in constructing the team's new practice court.  Not content to stop there, Nike keeps developing new applications for this innovative product, and recycled material from Nike Grind is now used in 71% of the company's footwear and apparel!

Empathize: Hub of Hope Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as SEPTA did when they agreed to collaborate with other agencies to serve homeless people where they already congregate...at Suburban Station.  Instead of kicking the homeless out, the agencies worked together to open the Hub of Hope, a site that functions as a daytime living room for homeless individuals, where they can socialize, get a meal, shower, do laundry, and access a variety of health and social services in a safe and welcoming setting.

Define: Embrace Badge

Nice work using your powers of perception!  Good designers keep their eyes and minds open so they don't miss key insights...just as four Stanford students did while creating a low-cost baby incubator for developing countries.  To learn more about the problem, team member Linus Liang traveled to Nepal.  His "aha" moment came when he discovered that hospital incubators often went unused because mothers couldn’t get to, or stay at the hospital.  The team realized they had to create something that could be used easily and affordably in homes, as well as in hospitals.  The team kept researching and learning throughout their design process to make sure their product met the needs of the people they wanted to help.  Since 2011 their solution—the Embrace Incubator—has helped over 200,000 babies in 20 countries.

Ideate: 40/4 Chair Badge

Way to get creative!  It's not always easy to see things with new eyes, and sometimes ingenious design is hidden right in front of you.  When was the last time you gave any thought to the humble stacking chair?  Designer David Rowland spent 8 years of his own time designing a chair that could be compactly stacked to fit the greatest number of chairs in the smallest amount of space.  He made 32 full-scale models in a quest to achieve the best form and greatest comfort, and he was rejected many times when he tried to license his final design for a chair that could be stacked 40 high at a height of just 4 feet.  But he persisted, and today his 40/4 chair is the winner of numerous awards, is showcased in museums around the world, and is a commercial success.  8 million and counting have been sold since 1964!

Prototype: Kenji Ekuan Badge

Well done! Prototyping takes patience and persistence, as Kenji Ekuan demonstrated when he and his team spent three years creating the iconic design of the elegant, tear-drop shaped Kikkoman soy sauce bottle.  Mr. Ekuan, an award-winning designer who also worked on the Yamaha YA-1 and the Komachi Bullet Train, is said to have tested over 100 prototypes before finalizing the design of the innovative and dripless two-sided spout—a design which works so well it hasn't been altered since it was introduced in 1961!

Test: MWOBS Badge

Now you know...testing's not just for school!  Designers know it's important to put their prototypes through rigorous real-world tests, which is why people who design products to function in extreme outdoor environments go to the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire, where the conditions are equivalent to what you’d encounter in Antarctica and the polar regions!  Clothing, experimental robots, and tents are just a few of the products to test their mettle against the mountain!

DT Philly Showcase: Es Devlin Badge

Hooray—you've made it to the final stage of DT Philly, and it’s time to think about how you’ll share the story of your design project.  Take a page from the playbook of renowned set designer Es Devlin and consider your presentation from the perspective of the audience.  How will they see, hear, and experience the story you want to tell?  Devlin, who has designed sets for Kanye West, Beyoncé, and Rihanna, as well as for fashion shows, plays, operas, and ballets, considers both the spirit of the performance and the experience that the audience will share.  What will bring your story to life and help you connect with your audience?

Collaborator Badge 2 of 4

Way to take it to the next level!  Keep the collaboration going!