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The Marketing Maniacs

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Reese Cogswell's picture
9/9/19 · Assignment: Field Notes #1
Reese Cogswell ·
Did you hear about the man who ate a clock for lunch? It was very time consuming.

About Us

We are a group of seniors who have been in this marketing class for three years now. Karl is the funny one who works at Walmart, Anaya loves to cook, Maleeha does not work, Star is the creative one, Tyler is the smart one, and Zakariya works at his dad's Pizza shop.

Badges

Start-up Stage: Roli Badge

Congratulations on your creative problem solving—an essential skill for every designer.  Innovations and break-through moments come when you think outside the box, the way Roli did when they reimagined traditional ways of learning to play music.  Mastering an instrument requires time and commitment, not to mention lessons.  Roli’s LUMI keyboard makes learning more independent, easy, and fun by teaching people to play with illuminated key patterns.  Even better, the keyboard is expandable and connects to high-tech musical production devices developed by Roli and used by the pros.  With Roli, there’s no limit to the musical masterpieces ahead!

Empathize Stage: Miyake Badge

Thanks for taking a walk in someone else's shoes.  Designers empathize to understand the needs of the people they want to help, just as Seiichi Miyake did when a friend began losing his vision.  Concerned about his friend’s ability to safely navigate traffic crossings, Miyake invented Tenji blocks, or tactile paving.  The raised dots and bars on this type of paving can be felt underfoot and help people who are visually impaired understand when they are approaching danger and when they are on a safe path.  You see this form of paving at street crossings and train platforms.  First used in Japan, this innovation is now found in the United States and throughout the world!

Define Stage: Ando Badge

Nice work!  Asking thoughtful questions is the first step along the path to a great solution, and it’s where Japanese inventor Momofuku Ando started when his country was struggling with food shortages in the years after World War II.  The United States sent shipments of flour and encouraged the Japanese to make bread.  Bread was not part of the food culture in Japan, so Ando asked what would work better for the Japanese people and hit upon the idea of non-perishable ramen noodles.  Getting the texture and flavor just right proved challenging, but once he discovered a way to achieve his goal, packaged ramen—and later, Cup Noodles—took off, securing Ando’s place in culinary history.

Ideate Stage: Graviky Labs Badge

Way to get creative!  It’s not always easy to see things in a new light, but that’s what Anirudh Sharma and his team at Graviky Labs did when they began experimenting with ways to turn air pollution into something useful.  With carbon emissions captured from sources like cars, boats, and factories, the team developed a product called Air Ink.  One Air Ink marker contains 40-50 minutes of automobile emissions.  By developing products for artists and industry, Graviky Labs found a way to turn something harmful into something meaningful and beautiful.

Prototype Stage: Fish & Cox Badge

That’s how to get the ball rolling!  The perfect idea doesn’t always spring from your mind fully formed, but “aha” moments abound during prototyping.  The inventors of Silly String set out to develop a spray-on cast to help heal broken bones, but in testing different prototypes for the nozzle they tried one that sent the product flying and realized they had the makings of a fun toy.  After adjusting the formula, Leonard Fish and Robert Cox pitched the product to toy company Wham-O, which patented the idea and started selling the colorful, foamy spray.  The history of Silly String hasn’t been all fun and games, though…in another creative twist, military personnel have used the product to locate trip wires while on patrol. 

Test Stage: Lands’ End Badge

Now you see…rigorous testing is the key to a quality product and a happy user.  This is why the team at Lands’ End checks their products’ performance and gets feedback from real users…like the crew of a cargo ship!  Product testing in a lab is a key part of the quality control process, but testing with real people using the product in the real world—like the cold, wet deck of a cargo ship—gives the Lands’ End team insights they can’t get from an artificial environment. 

Presentation Stage: Mighty Oak Badge

Way to be a wordsmith!  There are many good ways to tell a story and connect with an audience.  Mighty Oak, a women-owned creative studio, is known for its distinctive approach to animating stories using handmade props.  The creative process at Mighty Oak focuses on understanding clients’ missions and communicating them in a fresh, engaging way.  The team has worked for clients like HBO, Netflix, and General Electric as well as nonprofits like the Vera Institute of Justice, and in 2018, they were named to Fast Company’s list of the 100 most creative people in business.   

Collaborator Badge

To earn this badge, collaborate on a task with a mentor or design consultant.

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